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Alter Botanischer Garten

Alter Botanischer Garten

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Created by komoot users
Recommended by 209 out of 217 hikers

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  • Söhni 🏃

    Hamburg's green heart beats between the Congress Center Hamburg and Millerntor: Planten un Blomen. The traditional park is home to various themed gardens, including the Old Botanical Garden Hamburg and one of the largest Japanese landscape gardens in Europe.
    Planten un Blomen offers much more than the eponymous "plants and flowers"
    Further information at: plantenunblomen.hamburg.de

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    • May 19, 2017

  • 🅰️gavia

    Everything without admission. The park has two large playgrounds and many different seating options. There is also a roller skating / inline skating rink and of course eating and drinking 😉

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    • June 22, 2019

  • JR56

    In 1821 the botanist Johann Georg Christian Lehmann planted the first tree of the Planten un Blomen, which is the most famous park in Hamburg today. The Low German name Planten un Blomen, in High German plants and flowers, is the program of this unique city garden, because the Planten un Blomen unite 300 types of roses, several tropical greenhouses and the largest Japanese garden in Europe on an area of 47 hectares.
    A tour through the beautiful park is particularly recommended in spring and summer when everything is in full bloom.
    hamburg-highlights.info/freizeit/planten-un-blomen

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    • March 1, 2019

  • Siegfried LG

    The garden was also designed by the Japanese landscape architect Yoshikuni Araki and laid out in 1988. The paths through this total work of art lead past rocks, watercourses and still ponds - and present the viewer with the beauty, balance and tranquility of the garden from changing perspectives.

    Source:
    plantenunblomen.hamburg.de/japanischer-landschaftsgarten

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    • September 15, 2018

  • Siegfried LG

    The show greenhouses of the Botanical Garden of the University of Hamburg were built for the IGA in 1963. They replaced the greenhouses that were destroyed in the war based on a design by the architect Prof. Bernhard Hermkes. The greenhouses accommodate around 2,800 square meters of plants from the world's different climatic zones - from the tropical jungle to the desert. The complex is divided into five areas. In addition to the tropical house there is a subtropical, a cactus and a fern house. The construction is particularly remarkable: the glazing is suspended from external profiles and the interior is free of load-bearing elements. Both the greenhouses and the neighboring Mediterranean terraces are listed buildings.

    The Mediterranean terraces were laid out by the garden architects Plomin, Raderschall and Schulze. Layered slabs shape the structure of the terraces. The dark slate stores the heat of the sun and offers ideal conditions for many southern plants, such as hibiscus, clematis, figs, mammoth leaves and limes. The facility with its Mediterranean flair is probably the sunniest place in Hamburg.

    Source:
    plantenunblomen.hamburg.de/gaerten- Pflanzen/

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    • September 15, 2018

  • Stefan

    Plants and blomes I have in my memory as a retreat from the bustle of the metropolis Hamburg. There is always a shady spot somewhere, and after a round of power-napping you will have energy to go exploring again. I do not have to mention that the park itself is an attraction.

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    • June 22, 2019

  • JR56

    A tropical house complex is located in the center of the park. The greenhouses were opened for the IGA in 1963 - the peculiarity of the supporting structure enables the interior spaces to be free of supporting elements at a maximum height of 13 m. The complex is divided into five areas according to plant groups and habitats and - like the adjoining Mediterranean terraces - is a listed building.

    The show greenhouses of the Botanical Garden of the University of Hamburg offer every visitor the opportunity to delve deep into the realms of science. Divided into tropical, subtropical, cactus and fern houses, plants from all of the world's climatic zones are exhibited on 2800 square meters. Since the houses are located directly in Planten un Blomen, a subsequent walk through the green parks is a good idea.

    hamburg-tourism.de/sehen-erleben/gruenes-hamburg/parks-gruenanlagen/planten-un-blomen

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    • February 18, 2020

  • JR56

    The publicly accessible tropical greenhouses are located at the old location of the Botanical Garden in the municipal park 'Planten un Blomen' at Dammtor. The complex, planned by Bernhard Hermkes (1903-1995) and now a listed building, comprises a total of five interconnected houses, which consist of a glass construction that is suspended from external hollow box profiles; their interiors are therefore free of load-bearing elements.

    With an area of around 800 m² and a maximum height of 13 m, the tropical house is the largest element. The plants of South America and tropical crops are exhibited as special focuses.

    The plants collected in the subtropical house include the so-called hardwood trees (e.g. laurel, olive), various subtropical conifers (e.g. araucarias), palms, eucalyptus species and tree ferns. The geographical orientation of the show house applies above all to the Mediterranean area and the Canary Islands, the South African Cape and the hard-leaf areas of California and southern Chile.
    The Palm Fernhhaus is a special feature of the Hamburg Botanical Garden, as it is dedicated to a group of plants whose flowering dates back millions of years. Botanically prominent here are some specimens of cycads, which the founder of the Hamburg Botanical Garden, Prof. Johann Georg Christian Lehmann (1792-1860), used in 1834 as a template for the description of new species.

    The fern house brings together plants from all tropical regions of the world, while the succulent house is dedicated to the plants from the arid regions of the world, especially the semi-deserts and deserts of America and Africa.

    universitaetssammlungen.de/sammlung/384

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    • February 18, 2020

  • Pittsen

    A visit to the green lung of Hamburg is highly recommended.

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    • June 6, 2017

  • 🌍Toschi🐢🐌

    Well worth a visit.

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    • November 22, 2020

  • JR56

    For more than 150 years, Hamburg's old botanical garden was located in the ramparts at Dammtor. Its founder, Prof. Lehmann, developed the initially private garden into an important scientific institution and a popular local recreation destination. The desire for enlargement and clean air led to the relocation of the garden to the Klein Flottbek district in 1973.
    The greenhouses are still looked after by the Botanical Garden of the University of Hamburg

    With the project "Discovery Stations", the Botanical Association of Hamburg draws attention to botanical and historically remarkable places in the Old Botanical Garden at 11 stations:
    It is a botanical and horticultural jewel that is taken for granted and whose value is far too underestimated. In 2003/2004, the Hamburg Botanical Association was heavily involved in maintaining the show greenhouses and collected 24,000 signatures for this.

    Result: They will be retained and will be owned by the ZEIT Foundation. But the outdoor area is also worth such a commitment. It combines botany and city history: Medieval city moat, historical plane tree and unchanged routing from the Biedermeier period, Alpinum from around 1900, Mediterranean terraces from 1963. In addition to the parks along the Elbe, the Ohlsdorfer Friedhof or the city park, the Old Botanical Garden is one of them of the most important garden monuments in Hamburg.

    Discovery stations are intended to encourage people to rediscover this. The project is aimed at adults and children alike. So there is not only something to read, but also something to touch or observe.

    botanischerverein.de/aktion-und-projekte/entdeckerstationen

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    • February 18, 2020

  • JR56

    To the west of the greenhouses, on the slope of the Bucerius Law School campus, there are bricked-up entrances to a tunnel bunker from the Second World War. The spacious bunker should provide protection for up to 2,000 people. A planned but never realized extension of the tunnel system to under the music hall and today's exhibition halls could have protected up to 4,000 people. The system was never used. The construction was planned until November 1945, in May 1945 the Second World War ended in Europe. In 1962 the entrances and ventilation shafts were filled in and walled up.

    de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planten_un_Blomen

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    • February 18, 2020

  • Nancy 😗 🥾🚶‍♀️⛰ 🚴‍♀️

    The Planten un Blomen park was created on a part of the former Hamburg ramparts and is a must for every nature lover. As one of the greenest attractions in the Hanseatic city, the park not only invites you to sunbathe and relax, but also various attractions to be discovered.

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    • November 24, 2020

  • JR56

    The Johan van Valckenburgh Bridge is a bridge in the Neustadt district of Hamburg, built in 1962 and named in 1991 after the engineer of the Hamburg ramparts, Johan van Valckenburgh. In the Planten un Blomen park, it leads from the tropical greenhouses over the remains of the former moat built between 1615 and 1626 to the memorial plaque for the bridge's namesake.

    The bridge was planned by the architect Bernhard Hermkes, built in 1962 and renovated in 1989. The building is a listed building and is managed by the “State Office for Roads, Bridges and Waters” (LSBG) of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg.

    de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johan-van-Valckenburgh-Br%C3%BCcke

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    • February 18, 2020

  • R🅰️ndn🅾️tiz

    At this point, one of the bastions erected by the Dutch fortress builder Valckenburgh in the 17th century rose, which prevented a capture of the city during the Thirty Years' War. The name is still often immortalized in street names with -wall: Dammtorwall, Gorch-Fock-Wall, Steintorwall, Wallringtunnel and even more. The ramparts also have their name and are the result of the demolition of the fortress walls.

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    • May 28, 2019

  • Mischa

    Free entry to a highly recommended greenhouse with a small aquarium area. Be sure to leave a donation :)

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    • April 3, 2020

  • The Vogg

    The entrances have a small opening for bats, which find shelter in the bunker.

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    • October 24, 2020

  • Gaby

    Natural idyll in the middle of the big city. Pure relaxation

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    • April 19, 2019

  • Gerhard

    Here in the southeast part there is the Old Botanical Garden and the Japanese Landscape Garden.

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    • March 14, 2020

  • Mischa

    The botanical garden is always worth a visit.

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    • April 3, 2020

  • Sopho, Micha & Bella 🐶🐾

    Planten un Blomen is a 47 hectare park in the center of Hamburg.
    The name is Low German and means "plants and flowers".
    The founder and first director of the Botanical Garden in the Hamburg Wallanlagen, Johann Georg Christian Lehmann, planted a plane tree, the first tree in the park, on November 6, 1821.
    It is located at the Dammtor entrance between the Tropenhaus and the Congress Center and is a natural symbol for the beginnings of the garden.
    In summer there are public theater performances for children, water light concerts and music performances.
    Admission is free.
    Because of the parks and playgrounds, the park is also a popular destination regardless of events.

    (Source: Wikipedia)

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    • February 14, 2021

  • Sopho, Micha & Bella 🐶🐾

    The Loki-Schmidt-Garten is a public park at the Biozentrum of the University of Hamburg in Hamburg-Osdorf at the Klein Flottbek S-Bahn station.
    Until 2012 it was called the New Botanical Garden.
    The greenhouses of the former Botanical Gardens on the grounds of Planten un Blomen at Dammtor also belong to it.

    (Source: Wikipedia)

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    • February 14, 2021

  • Sopho, Micha & Bella 🐶🐾

    The show greenhouses of the Botanical Garden of the University of Hamburg were built for the IGA in 1963.
    They replaced the greenhouses that were destroyed in the war based on a design by the architect Prof. Bernhard Hermkes.
    The greenhouses accommodate around 2,800 square meters of plants from the world's different climatic zones - from the tropical jungle to the desert.
    The complex is divided into five areas.
    In addition to the tropical house there is a subtropical, a cactus and a fern house.
    The construction is particularly remarkable:
    The glazing is suspended from external profiles and the interior is free of load-bearing elements.
    Both the greenhouses and the neighboring Mediterranean terraces are listed buildings.

    (Source: plantenunblomen.hamburg.de)

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    • February 14, 2021

  • Sopho, Micha & Bella 🐶🐾

    A bunker from the Second World War is hidden in the “Planten un Blomen” park.

    (Source: hamburg-history.info)

    translated byView Original
    • February 14, 2021


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Location: Hamburg, Germany

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Alter Botanischer Garten