Hamburger Rathaus

Hiking Highlight

Recommended by 116 out of 135 hikers

Tips

  • Söhni 🏃

    In front of the historical backdrop of the town hall, markets regularly take place, including the popular Christmas market. Thus, visitors are served their own Rathausmarkt mulled wine. The Hamburg and Hamburg visitors love the market: Almost three million visitors are counted year after year.

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    • 05/19/2017

  • Siegfried LG

    Like Phoenix from the ashes, the new town hall rises after the great fire in 1842. It attracts millions of visitors with pride and power and the 112-meter-high tower is one of Hamburg's landmarks. Only when Hamburg had recovered economically the new building could be realized and completed in 1897. Today it is hard to imagine and the Rathausplatz is one of the central squares.

    translated byView Original
    • 07/20/2017

  • Natascha

    The present town hall is probably the sixth town hall in town history. The first two were probably located in the Neustadt am Hopfenmarkt and in the Erzbischöfliche Altstadt at the Alter Fischmarkt. After the unification of both cities in 1216, a joint town hall was built on the small Johannisstraße, Dornbusch corner. A fire in 1284 destroyed all the houses and probably also the town hall. Only the basement vault was preserved and served as council wine cellar and wine warehouse. The building erected on it later received the name Eimbeck's house, as it was the only one to have a bar for Einbecker beer. The council wine cellar collapsed in 1842 at the Great fire in half. A salvaged Bacchus figure is still standing today in the town hall at the staircase to the Council wine cellar of the entrance Große Johannisstraße.
    Around 1290, a larger town hall was built on the river Neß on the Trostbrücke. The brick building, which was built on a surface of 26 meters by 17 meters with a two-storey hall, was gradually extended. The lower court was added and at the beginning of the 17th century a Renaissance cultivation. In 1619 the Hamburg bank moved in. This building ensemble in the neighborhood of the old Hamburg stock exchange formed the political and economic center of Hamburg for several centuries.

    translated byView Original
    • 05/14/2018

  • Natascha

    One of the focal points of Hamburg.

    translated byView Original
    • 05/22/2018

  • Natascha

    The Hamburg City Hall is the seat of the citizenship (parliament) and the senate (state government) of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg.

    The architecturally magnificent building on the Binnenalster was built between the years 1886 and 1897 by various builders in the historicist style of the Neo-Renaissance. The tower has a height of 112 meters and is thus a striking landmark in Hamburg cityscape.
    The present town hall is probably the sixth town hall in town history. The first two were probably located in the Neustadt am Hopfenmarkt and in the Erzbischöfliche Altstadt at the Alter Fischmarkt. After the unification of both cities in 1216, a joint town hall was built on the small Johannisstraße, Dornbusch corner. A fire in 1284 destroyed all the houses and probably also the town hall. Only the basement vault was preserved and served as council wine cellar and wine warehouse. The building erected on it later received the name Eimbeck's house, as it was the only one to have a bar for Einbecker beer. The council wine cellar collapsed in 1842 at the Great fire in half. A salvaged Bacchus figure is still standing today in the town hall at the staircase to the Council wine cellar of the entrance Große Johannisstraße.
    Around 1290, a larger town hall was built on the river Neß on the Trostbrücke. The brick building, which was built on a surface of 26 meters by 17 meters with a two-storey hall, was gradually extended. The lower court was added and at the beginning of the 17th century a Renaissance cultivation. In 1619 the Hamburg bank moved in. This building ensemble in the neighborhood of the old Hamburg stock exchange formed the political and economic center of Hamburg for several centuries.

    translated byView Original
    • 05/14/2018

  • Siegfried LG

    On the night of May 5, 1842, a fire broke out in Hamburg. Quickly the flames spread in the narrow streets. To stop the fire, the Hamburg blasted their old town hall at the Trostbrücke. Only four days after the Great Fire began the reconstruction of Hamburg.
    However, 55 years passed before the new town hall was moved into which the senate and the citizenry conducted the affairs of state in provisional rooms. The citizens argued about where the new building should be built and who should design it. Nearly two hundred proposals were submitted for two architectural competitions, none of which was implemented.

    Finally, the architect Martin Haller took the initiative: The son of a former mayor founded a Rathausmeisterbund with the local builders Johannes Grotjan, Bernhard Hansen, Wilhelm Hauer, Emil Meerwein, Hugo Stammann and Gustav Zinnow. For five years, they developed plans for the new political heart of the Hanseatic city. On May 6, 1886, the foundation stone was laid for the new building.
    The construction work was sluggish: A cholera epidemic and a construction worker strike slowed the craftsmen. Incidentally, Kaiser Wilhelm II visited the town hall even before completion. On June 19, 1895, he came to Hamburg to celebrate the opening of the Kiel Canal. The event gave the Kaisersaal its name.
    After more than half a century, the people of Hamburg received their new town hall on October 26, 1897: it was officially inaugurated with a folk festival. Dr. Lehmann handed over as Chairman of the Town Hall Construction Commission Put the key "as a visible sign that the new town hall is ready to serve the purpose for which it was built."

    Source:
    hamburg.de/rathausgeschichte

    translated byView Original
    • 06/21/2018

  • Natascha

    The Hamburg City Hall is the seat of the citizenship (parliament) and the senate (state government) of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg.
    The architecturally magnificent building on the Binnenalster was built between the years 1886 and 1897 by various builders in the historicist style of the Neo-Renaissance. The tower has a height of 112 meters and is thus a striking landmark in Hamburg cityscape.
    The present town hall is probably the sixth town hall in town history. The first two were probably located in the Neustadt am Hopfenmarkt and in the Erzbischöfliche Altstadt at the Alter Fischmarkt. After the unification of both cities in 1216, a joint town hall was built on the small Johannisstraße, Dornbusch corner. A fire in 1284 destroyed all the houses and probably also the town hall. Only the basement vault was preserved and served as council wine cellar and wine warehouse. The building erected on it later received the name Eimbeck's house, as it was the only one to have a bar for Einbecker beer. The council wine cellar collapsed in 1842 at the Great fire in half. A salvaged Bacchus figure is still standing today in the town hall at the staircase to the Council wine cellar of the entrance Große Johannisstraße.
    Around 1290, a larger town hall was built on the river Neß on the Trostbrücke. The brick building, which was built on a surface of 26 meters by 17 meters with a two-storey hall, was gradually extended. The lower court was added and at the beginning of the 17th century a Renaissance cultivation. In 1619 the Hamburg bank moved in. This building ensemble in the neighborhood of the old Hamburg stock exchange formed the political and economic center of Hamburg for several centuries.

    translated byView Original
    • 02/24/2019

  • Heiko

    Impressive construction and center in the city

    translated byView Original
    • 08/21/2018

  • Natascha

    Town hall:
    The present town hall is probably the sixth town hall in town history. The first two were probably located in the Neustadt am Hopfenmarkt and in the Erzbischöfliche Altstadt at the Alter Fischmarkt. After the unification of both cities in 1216, a joint town hall was built on the small Johannisstraße, Dornbusch corner. A fire in 1284 destroyed all the houses and probably also the town hall. Only the basement vault was preserved and served as council wine cellar and wine warehouse. The building erected on it later received the name Eimbeck's house, as it was the only one to have a bar for Einbecker beer. The council wine cellar collapsed in 1842 at the Great fire in half. A salvaged Bacchus figure is still standing today in the town hall at the staircase to the Council wine cellar of the entrance Große Johannisstraße.
    Around 1290, a larger town hall was built on the river Neß on the Trostbrücke. The brick building, which was built on a surface of 26 meters by 17 meters with a two-storey hall, was gradually extended. The lower court was added and at the beginning of the 17th century a Renaissance cultivation. In 1619 the Hamburg bank moved in. This building ensemble in the neighborhood of the old Hamburg stock exchange formed the political and economic center of Hamburg for several centuries.

    translated byView Original
    • 02/24/2019

  • Zero-One

    Hamburg Town Hall / Town Hall Square

    translated byView Original
    • 06/05/2018

  • HansJoergOtt

    The Hamburg City Hall dominates the square and the surrounding area. There is always something going on here!

    translated byView Original
    • 09/02/2017

  • JR

    The Hamburg City Hall - built from 1886 to 1897 - dominates the center of the city with its impressive architecture. The magnificent sandstone building is the seat of the senate and the citizenry.
    After the Hamburg city hall was completely burned down in 1842, the council temporarily moved to provisional premises - for 55 years! The new town hall was inaugurated in 1897, has 647 rooms and stands on over 4,000 oak piles. In contrast to the Hanseatic style, the town hall shines with a lavishly decorated facade, which is lined with a total of 20 imperial statues. Above the main gate is written in Latin: "Freedom gained by the ancestors may seek to keep the descendants worthy." The ornate wrought-iron lattice door of the main portal leads to the town hall hall, which is supported by 16 sandstone pillars, which are painted with 68 portraits of deserving citizens of Hamburg. The staircase was made of Sardinian marble and shows the human way of life. The hall of citizenship is rather simple: Parliament meets here regularly.
    hamburg-tourism.de/sehenswertes/sehenswuerdigkeiten/rathaus

    translated byView Original
    • 01/30/2019

  • Holger

    History to touch and experience.

    translated byView Original
    • 04/28/2019

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Best Hikes that include the Highlight ‘Hamburger Rathaus’

Location: Hamburg, Germany

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