Frauenkirche - Die "Dicke"

Bike Touring Highlight

Created by komoot users
Recommended by 624 out of 687 cyclists

Tips

  • Matzel

    Interesting facts about the church before the destruction and about its reconstruction can be found here: de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrauenkirche_(Dresden)

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    • April 27, 2017

  • JoPaPe

    It's almost a miracle how beautifully this church has been restored. A sign that our architects and craftsmen of today are also able to create something beautiful like their former colleagues.

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    • June 2, 2018

  • Bandmaschine

    That's just part of it.

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    • October 21, 2017

  • JR56

    The Frauenkirche Dresden looks back on a thousand-year history. The various previous churches were already consecrated to the Mother of God and were called the Frauenkirche. In the 18th century, the famous George Bährs domed building was built, which shaped the cityscape of Dresden for two hundred years. Shortly before the end of the Second World War, the church was destroyed. Its ruins remained as a memorial in the heart of the city.

    More detailed information:

    frauenkirche-dresden.de/geschichte

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    • August 28, 2020

  • Andreas Kronier

    Great place, great church

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    • February 23, 2017

  • Alf

    In any case, climb the tower. The view is worthwhile.

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    • March 21, 2018

  • JoPaPe

    Completely destroyed at the end of World War II, it was re-consecrated in 2005. From afar, this architectural work of art shines in the skyline of Dresden. Architecture in the digital age and hopefully an eternal memorial against the war.

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    • June 6, 2018

  • Revelator

    All around it can be with a view of the church with delicious ice cream or Erdinger Isoton stay well.

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    • August 22, 2018

  • Coriander

    The panoramic view from the tower of the Frauenkirche is also recommended.

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    • September 24, 2018

  • Bjoern

    The Frauenkirche is famous today mainly for its destruction. Less well known is that it was also misused in the Third Reich for the purposes of the Nazi state. The central figure was initially the National Socialist Bishop Friedrich Coch. On June 30, 1933 appointed bishop, he sought to merge Nazi ideology and church. Pictures show him leaving the Frauenkirche. Not in a bishop's robe, but in NS uniform. He joined the NSDAP in 1931. In May 1933 he faced the working group of National Socialist pastors who later merged into the "German Christians". He persistently pushed ahead with the synchronization, dismissed pastors who were critical of the regime and even introduced Hitler salute and the swastika flag in the churches. He was supported by Karl Fritsch. He rejected the baptism of people of Jewish origin in order to close a "gateway of the Jewish spirit into German nationality". His rigorous approach led to considerable upsets, which ended in November 1935 in his de facto disempowerment. The leadership was taken over by the somewhat more subtle Johannes Klotsche, who continued the NS church policy. Mutschmann's confidant called on the pastors to support the state from their pulpits in the fight against Judaism. From 1939 onwards, German Christian celebrations were held. On December 17, 1941, Christians of Jewish origin were expelled from the regional church. In the course of the course of the war, however, the reconstruction of the regional church was reduced in order not to endanger the unity of the people.

    Erich Koch died in September 1945 in an American internment camp. After the bombing in February 1945, nobody in Dresden wanted to provide him with accommodation. Klotsche died in Wehlen in February 1965. Even the end of the Nazi regime no longer wanted him to be given a position in the regional church.

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    • May 12, 2020

  • Gerd

    For decades, the Frauenkirche was both a ruin and a memorial. Nice that she has risen again!

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    • January 26, 2020

  • Bjoern

    Part of the tour series "Traces of brown rule 1933-1945:
    komoot.de/collection/933919/-dresden-history-spuren-brauner-herrschaft-1933-1945

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    • May 20, 2020

  • Rebecca

    The Frauenkirche in Dresden is an Evangelical Lutheran church of the Baroque and the formative monumental building of the Dresden Neumarkt.

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    • June 15, 2020

  • timm

    Would be destroyed in the war

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    • June 17, 2020

  • Sven

    An important insight into the history of the old town of Dresden. Insider tip 1:
    Panometer 360 ° - Dresden 1945 (permanent exhibition)

    Insider tip 2: look over the roofs of the old town from the Kreuzkirche. Not far from the Frauenkirche, less queuing and cheaper tickets.

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    • August 9, 2020

  • timm

    Was rebuilt after the fall of the Wall

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    • August 14, 2020

  • 🥾Sina

    Most beautiful church in Germany! For me anyway. Next year I will climb the dome

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    • August 23, 2020

  • suny

    The Frauenkirche in Dresden (originally Church of Our Lady [1] - the name refers to the Holy Mary) is an Evangelical Lutheran church of the baroque and the formative monumental building of the Dresden Neumarkt. It is considered a splendid testimony to the Protestant religious building, has one of the largest stone church domes north of the Alps and is one of the largest sandstone buildings in the world.The Dresden Frauenkirche was built from 1726 to 1743 according to a design by George Bähr and has become an emblem of both the Dresden Baroque and the famous city skyline. At the end of the Second World War it was badly damaged by the firestorm raging in Dresden during the air raids on Dresden in the night of February 13-14, 1945, and burned out on the morning of February 15. The ruins were preserved in the GDR and were left as a memorial against war and destruction.After the fall of the Wall, the clearing of rubble began in 1993 and, from 1994, the reconstruction of the church. The work, which was completed in 2005, was largely financed by support groups and donors from all over the world, including the US “Friends of Dresden”. On October 30, 2005, a consecration service and ceremony took place in the Frauenkirche. The ruin has now become a symbol of reconciliation.
    Wikibedia

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    • November 5, 2020

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Top Touring Cycling Routes to Frauenkirche - Die "Dicke"

Our Tour recommendations are based on thousands of activities completed by other people on komoot.

  • Easy
    01:21
    13.7 mi
    10.1 mph
    450 ft
    450 ft
  • Easy
    01:05
    11.1 mi
    10.2 mph
    225 ft
    225 ft
  • Easy
    01:01
    10.3 mi
    10.1 mph
    275 ft
    275 ft
  • Intermediate
    03:12
    32.1 mi
    10.0 mph
    1,100 ft
    1,100 ft
  • Intermediate
    02:50
    27.1 mi
    9.6 mph
    975 ft
    975 ft
  • Difficult
    04:39
    44.4 mi
    9.6 mph
    2,550 ft
    2,550 ft
  • Difficult
    02:13
    21.3 mi
    9.6 mph
    700 ft
    700 ft
  • Difficult
    04:27
    45.1 mi
    10.2 mph
    1,550 ft
    1,550 ft
Location: Saxony, Germany

Information

  • Elevation10 m

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