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Steintreppe/Keltentreppe auf den Ringwall

Steintreppe/Keltentreppe auf den Ringwall

Hiking Highlight

Created by komoot users
Recommended by 519 out of 530 hikers

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  • Hunsbuckel 🇺🇦

    In 1837 the Prussian Crown Prince and later King Friedrich Wilhelm IV (1795-1861), brother of the later Kaiser Wilhelm I, appeared personally to examine the "Hunnenring". As a result, the plant gained importance and prevented further destruction by removal as building material. The stone staircase was created so that the Crown Prince could view the wall safely.

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    • September 14, 2019

  • Wahlium

    Crossing over the Keltenringwall. A mighty facility and on top of that a great view into the distance. Beyond the wall, information boards on the construction phases and construction.
    Impressive. Of course, the stairs don't meet today's requirements, so bring a little surefootedness

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    • August 27, 2017

  • Hunsbuckel 🇺🇦

    In 1837 the Prussian Crown Prince and later King Friedrich Wilhelm IV (1795-1861), brother of the later Kaiser Wilhelm I, appeared in person to inspect the "Hunnenring". As a result, the facility gained importance and prevented further destruction through removal as building material.
    The stone staircase was laid out so that the Crown Prince could see the wall safely.

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    • September 13, 2019

  • Anja 🌞 🌈

    An impressive stone staircase and more accessible than the other

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    • March 29, 2020

  • Hunsbuckel 🇺🇦

    The second way to climb the Celtic ring wall.
    The "Stone Staircase" further to the west (unfortunately the pictures are out of place here) was built in 1837 for the Prussian Crown Prince in the defensive structure so that he could safely climb the wall.
    The necessity is noticeable when the route chooses the eastern part of the ring wall, which consists of loosely piled walls that still tilt and can only be walked with caution and sturdy shoes. Only in a few places has some vegetation found a hold and over time some humus has accumulated to make the stones easier to walk on.

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    • September 14, 2019

  • JM

    The so-called king staircase.

    Be careful the steps are uneven!

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    • June 10, 2019

  • Paul G

    Overwhelming and immediately amazed what kind of achievement it must have been to have built such a huge ring at the time it was made. Great view from the top. Perfect for expanding the tour to include the Nonnweiler dam.

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    • May 1, 2020

  • Andy

    Standing all alone on the stone wall in the middle of July is a sublime feeling.
    Impressive what people are capable of.

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    • October 10, 2020

  • Max

    Worthwhile hike with great views!

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    • May 28, 2018

  • TriMage (Ralf)

    The Celts must have had a lot of time and enormous boredom - or a lot of enemies to defend themselves against. In any case, this wall consists of an unbelievably large amount of stones and you should actually have stood on top.
    If you like, you can also hike along the wall, but this is sometimes a bit more difficult, as the stones are more or less loosely on top of each other. If you don't want that, do it like us and go up the stairs on one side and down the other side ...

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    • June 30, 2020

  • Tobias

    Historical and promising!

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    • August 18, 2018

  • Anja 🌞 🌈

    The stairs in the middle are easily accessible, the ones on the edge less

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    • March 29, 2020

  • Anja 🌞 🌈

    A great view, but also a shaky affair

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    • March 29, 2020

  • Daniel B.

    This point on the ring wall is specially intended as a crossing aid, the premium hiking trail Dollbergschleife also uses it.

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    • July 5, 2020

  • Daniel B.

    The Celtic ring wall ("Hunnenring") is definitely an experience. History, explained using information boards, great atmosphere, great views of the Hunsrück.

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    • July 5, 2020

  • Marc 🇧🇪👍😎

    Still be careful on the stairs, especially in rainy weather

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    • October 6, 2020

  • Markus

    Experience hike and history together

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    • October 12, 2020

  • Thomas ADFC Saar

    Climb over the Celtic ring wall (Hunnenring).

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    • December 5, 2020

  • 𝒯𝒶𝓃𝒿𝒶

    The stairs at the ring wallIn 1836 the residents of Otzenhausen and the surrounding area used the stones of the ring wall as building material. For fear of the cultural heritage, Count Villers von Burgesch, a member of the "Society for Useful Research", wrote to the then Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm IV and asked that the local people be forbidden from doing so. The king appeared in person on the "Ringwall" a year later. So that the king could comfortably climb the fortress, a staircase was built over the north wall. The royal visit had far-reaching consequences that will continue into the future. The ring wall of Otzenhausen became a protected cultural monument and was saved from destruction. The staircase now enables everyone to cross this imposing monument.

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    • October 4, 2021

  • 𝒯𝒶𝓃𝒿𝒶

    The main wall - north wall part 1The imposing rock masses of the north wall are silent witnesses of what was once the mightiest Celtic fortress walls in Europe. Built to seal off the populated mountain spur from the adjoining mountain ridge, this wall had to be far more powerful than the side walls. Due to the hillside location there, these were difficult to attack by an enemy. With a height of over 10m and a base width of 40m, the collapse of the wall still gives an impression of its former size. Based on a formerly vertical front and rear, it would have been in the 1st century BC. Chr. Had a size of about 20m high and 25m thick. However, the north wall is much older. Already around 400 BC A wall crossing the ridge from W-E, consisting of a wooden frame with earth and stone filling, was built. As a section wall with a trench in front of it, it formed the oldest wall of the fortress. A second, similar section wall was located at the height of today's refuge as a second defensive wall. At the latest in the 1st century BC. The now recognizable ring wall, a circumferential, closed fortress wall was built. This probably happened in the course of the Germanic dangers and the Gallic War. The later wall construction of the 1st century v. BC, which was built over the remains of the section wall, has not yet been investigated. The huge, loose rock masses prevent this. Was the north wall built in the manner of a "murus gallicus", the Gallic wall, described by Caesar. This consisted of a framework of nailed or mortised beams with the local Taunus quartzite filling. In any case, this could be proven in the gate area of the fortress. Or was the wall simply constructed as a heaped stone wall? In addition to its fortification significance, the fortress was also used for representational purposes. Outwardly, it impressively reflected the power of the ruling prince on the ridge that was deforested at the time. Source: Text information board - Dr. T Fritsch, Terrex GmbH

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    • October 4, 2021

  • Marc 🇧🇪👍😎

    Dangerous stairs in rainy weather

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    • October 6, 2020

  • Jürgen Bäcker

    The easiest way to climb the wall, but be careful, no standard levels🤣

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    • December 20, 2020

  • Jürgen Weiß🌳👫

    Beautiful and impressive, always worth a photo

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    • June 21, 2021

  • MGBreva 🏍

    Unique sight. Very well designed information boards.

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    • October 27, 2021


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Location: Nonnweiler, St. Wendel, Saarland, Germany

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  • Elevation670 m

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