Finish
 

About Finish

FinishspartWasser – InitiativeUnberührte Natur, idyllische Landschaften, malerische Weitblicke über unsere Wälder – was sonst
jedes Wandererherz beflügelt, ist heute nicht mehr ganz das, was es einmal war: Unseren Wäldern
sieht man die Trockenzeiten der letzten Jahre an. Die einst so stolzen Forstgebiete unserer Region
brauchen unsere Hilfe.
Deshalb setzt sich die Geschirrspülmittel-Marke Finish dafür ein, dass wir alle bewusster mit der
Ressource Wasser umgehen, damit unsere Natur wieder aufatmen kann. Die komoot-Collections von
Finish wollen darauf aufmerksam machen, wie es um den deutschen Wald steht und dazu
inspirieren, im Alltag mehr Wasser zu sparen.
Als ersten Schritt können wir zum Beispiel damit aufhören, unser Geschirr vorzuspülen, bevor wir es
in die Spülmaschine geben. Denn noch spülen 44% der Deutschen ihr Geschirr vor und dabei werden
jedes Mal bis zu 24 Liter Wasser verbraucht. Somit verschwenden wir allein in Deutschland jährlich
über 25 Milliarden Liter Wasser – und das nur, weil wir Geschirr vorspülen. 1 Die Initiative
#FinishspartWasser will Schluss machen mit Vorspülen.
Und Finish geht mit der Mission #FinishspartWasser noch einen Schritt weiter: Gemeinsam mit der
Schutzgemeinschaft Deutscher Wald (SDW) werden 2021 25.000 Bäume gepflanzt, um unsere
Wälder wieder aufzuforsten.

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  1. Finish planned a hike.

    June 7, 2021

    02:54
    6.49 mi
    2.2 mph
    625 ft
    625 ft
    Samweis, Lutz and 12 others like this.
    1. Finish

      A moor for dry feet: The Schützenbergmoor near Oberhof is the only high moor educational trail in Thuringia. On a 230 meter long, barrier-free footbridge you can discover the five-hectare high moor and its rare flora and fauna.The bog is 2,500 years old and two and a half meters thick. It grows by a millimeter every year - provided, of course, that the moor does not have to withstand extremely long periods of drought. During a walk you can discover cranberries, bogberries and crowberries as well as the round-leaved sundew.The moor lies at an altitude of 890 meters. The area has around 180 days of fog. If you like it a little mystical, the Schützenbergmoor is the right place on a day like this. In order for it to maintain its high level of moisture, the moor needs five degrees as an annual mean temperature and 1,200 millimeters of precipitation per year. Conversely, this means that global warming can also have an impact here.Your hike starts in Oberhof, which is also worth a stroll through town. Here you will discover many great houses clad with slate shingles that unfold their very own charm. Continue on the Rennsteig to the Schützenbergmoor, which you can explore on the footbridge.For a freshly tapped water, you make a stop at the violet fountain on the way back. On the way back, it is worth stopping at the Thüringer Hütte: why not try a Rostbratwurst in the bread roll. Leeeecker!

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      • June 7, 2021

  2. Finish planned a hike.

    May 30, 2021

    Anna, Marie and 6 others like this.
    1. Finish

      Drought damage and bark beetles: The Thuringian Forest is suffering. This is especially true for the Kyffhäuser area, because the small town of Artern is considered the driest place in Germany in 2020. Nowhere in Germany does it rain less than here. The fire brigade has problems with the extinguishing water, the anglers with dry water, and unfortunately the quality of the drinking water. The Bärental is a little south of Artern and still looks quite lush and green in the photos.But if you walk over the suspension bridge into the forest, you will see the clear traces of the drought. Some trees are bare, some have already fallen over, others just look really dry and sick. On a hike to the spectacular suspension bridge, you will also see why the nature in this area is so worth protecting. It is beautiful and provides a habitat for many animal and plant species.You start at the bus stop in Reinsdorf and first walk to a rest area. Here you can pause for a moment at the deer, take a sip and prepare for the great hike. We continue into the middle of the valley, from which only this one path leads in and out again. Soon you will reach the suspension bridge, on which you will hike over a gorge. Then you go back over the Enzian Wiesenweg, which will delight you with its variety of flowers.

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      • June 7, 2021

  3. Anna, Became and 3 others like this.
    1. Finish

      Sometimes he's there, sometimes not. The Bauerngraben in the Harz Mountains is a real surprise bag and shows you what it would be like if a pond were simply no longer there due to the drought. The Bauerngraben is an episodic lake, also known as a shrink basin, into which the Glasbach seeps away. The lake is characterized by the fact that it can suddenly fall dry if, for example, the drain opens up due to the dissolution of material such as fallen rock.Once the farmer's trench is filled with water, it can be a maximum of 4.3 hectares in size and contain around 200,000 cubic meters of water. The area has been a nature reserve since 1961. The Bauerngraben is also called Hungersee, which makes sense when you know that it has suddenly disappeared. You can explore the southern Harz gypsum karst landscape with its special lake phenomenon on foot.You start in Questenberg, where you can, for example, visit the castle ruins of the same name. We continue towards Bauerngraben. After about two kilometers you will first reach a parking lot with information boards. From there it is not far to the lake - or what is left of it.Now it's about 50 meters uphill again until you can enjoy a wonderful view of the Bauerngraben. This is also where the cliffs are located, which give the lake a magnificent backdrop. But be careful: You shouldn't deviate from the path because crevasses can sometimes open up in the karst landscape. After you have circled the Bauerngraben, it's back to Questenberg - look forward to a delicious stop.

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      • June 7, 2021

  4. Finish planned a hike.

    May 30, 2021

    Became, Reiko_nicht Heiko! and 2 others like this.
    1. Finish

      The Dubringer Moor in the district of Bautzen is one of the largest nature reserves in Saxony with its 1711 hectares. Here between the Elbe and Oder you will discover a true paradise for rare animal and plant species on your tour through the moor, past ponds and the floodplain of the Black Elster.Once you listen to the muffled calls of the great bittern, then you see sea eagles above you, in the evening the toads and frogs start their concert. You can also examine carnivorous sundew, cranberries or cotton grass meadows. Your binoculars definitely belong in your luggage.But even this beautiful natural idyll has to struggle with the region's lack of water. In principle, peatlands can cope well with a drought period. When it rains again, the moor sucks itself full of water and is first supplied. However, the moor must not dry out for too long, because otherwise there is a risk of it shrinking permanently.This also promotes forest cover, for example with pine trees, which then draw additional water from the moor. That would irrevocably destroy the moor and at the same time valuable habitat. Renaturation measures such as filling in drainage ditches help the moors to survive longer periods of drought.On the Krabat circular route around the moor, you will get up close and personal with this beautiful region. You start at the train station in Wittichenau-Kulow and can therefore easily travel by train. You circle the moor clockwise. After about nine kilometers on a good hiking trail you will reach the pitch ponds, which were once intended for fishing. And on it goes on the Krabat circular route, on which you discover the scenes of the Sorbian legend.You get the perfect overview of the moor area on the tower on the side of the path. Especially here you should have your binoculars ready. We continue on the Deichweg towards the starting point. About four kilometers from the village, you can stop off at the fish restaurant, which also serves local fish.

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      • June 7, 2021

  5. Became and Michael like this.
    1. Finish

      A lack of precipitation is also a problem for our lakes and rivers. For example, forty centimeters less water than normal was measured in Lake Starnberg in 2018. That was the lowest level in 110 years. Downward trend. The lake southwest of Munich has not lost its beauty as a result, but who knows how the water level will develop in the coming years?The almost 14-kilometer round starts at the train station in Possenhofen on the west side of the lake. You hike north on a wonderful panoramic path and let your gaze wander over the water. Shortly before Starnberg, turn left and take a course for the Maisinger Gorge. The path leads you on the banks of the leisurely flowing Maisinger Bach through the wild and romantic gorge.When you arrive at the Maisinger See, you've earned a long break. Let your gaze wander over the nature reserve and keep your eyes open for birds. If you haven't packed your own snack, you will find a large selection at the Seehof for refreshments. Soon you will leave the quiet forest and hike back to the starting point of the tour. How about cooling off in Lake Starnberg at the end? Not far from the train station, you will find a great swimming area.

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      • May 25, 2021

  6. Jürgen, Became and Michael like this.
    1. Finish

      The forests suffer from stress: a lack of precipitation causes the soil to dry out and the groundwater to sink. This makes it more and more difficult for the trees to supply themselves with sufficient water - especially for the spruce, which with their shallow roots can no longer get to the groundwater. This ensures dry forests and dying trees. This can be seen particularly dramatically in the Black Forest, which was reforested with spruce trees on a large scale in the middle of the 19th century. You can get a picture of the dry forests on this tour around Schramberg in the central Black Forest.

      The almost 24-kilometer hike begins at the “Am Hammergraben” car park on the banks of the Schiltach. With almost 1,000 meters of altitude, you can expect some crisp climbs on the route, but you will be rewarded with wonderful views of the city of clocks and the adjoining five valleys. The panorama on the walls of the three castle ruins that you pass on the way can be enjoyed especially princely.

      As it should be in a five-valley city, the tour leads you in a varied up and down around the city. If the entire loop is too long for you, you can shorten it at any time and hike straight back down to the valley town. Pack enough provisions for the route, there are no places to stop along the way. At the end of the tour you have more than earned a cozy stop.

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      • May 26, 2021

  7. Finish planned a hike.

    May 25, 2021

    Became, Alex and 2 others like this.
    1. Finish

      Around 11,700 years ago, when the last Ice Age came to an end, raised bogs formed all over Germany, including on the Hornisgrinde. The 1,165 meter high mountain in the northern Black Forest offered the perfect conditions for this - back then. Because human intervention and a lack of precipitation pose enormous challenges for nature in keeping the living space in harmony. That is why it is all the more important to protect such fragile habitats as the high moor on the Hornisgrinde.On this 17-kilometer circular hike you will get to know the striking Black Forest summit with its three towers. The tour starts at the parking lot at Mummelsee, a popular and well-known excursion destination. If you want to avoid tourists, it is worth starting your hike early in the morning. However, you will soon leave the Mummelsee and dive into the dense forest.You wander through the Black Forest in a wide area. The first highlight on your hike: the view of the Wilder See, probably the most idyllic lake in the Black Forest. If you have time, then the steep descent down to the shore is worthwhile (which of course is followed by an equally steep ascent). You can strengthen yourself afterwards in the Darmstädter Hütte. With a fantastic view of the Rhine plain, you then hike to the summit of the Hornisgrinde.You hike on plank paths through the fantastic moor landscape on the highest mountain in the northern Black Forest. Please always stay on the excellent paths to protect nature. From the observation tower on the summit you have a wonderful all-round view of the wooded Black Forest peaks, the flat Rhine plain and the Vosges mountains opposite. From here it's not far back to the Mummelsee.

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      • May 26, 2021

  8. Finish planned a hike.

    May 25, 2021

    Kerstin, Became and 5 others like this.
    1. Finish

      The largest bog complex in southern Germany stretches from Rosenheim to the Alps. In the 19th century, people mined peat on a large scale in the raised bogs, as was the case with Rauchling. The result: dry heaths and bog forests. This makes projects for the renaturation of wetlands all the more important, the successes of which you will get to know on your hike today. Because in the raised bogs, endangered plants and animals threatened with extinction find a protected habitat. In addition, bogs store water, improve water quality and provide cooling in hot summers.

      The start of your discovery tour through the Sterntaler and Nickelheimer Filze is at the hiking car park near Nickelheim, south of Rosenheim. On the 17-kilometer circuit you immerse yourself in the partly mystical, partly magical world of the moors, also known as felts. Take your time on your hike through the wonderful landscape, so you can watch rare birds and discover the magnificent flora. At the beginning you wander through the Sterntaler Filze, make a stop at the Kaltenbach ponds and walk back through the Nickelheimer Moor. On a moor nature trail, you can find out more about the special features of the habitat and let your gaze wander from the observation tower.

      On your hike through the nature reserve, please always stay on the marked trails so as not to destroy the wetlands and give its residents the peace and quiet they deserve. On the way you will pass several vantage points. So don't forget your binoculars and camera.

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      • May 26, 2021

  9. Finish planned a hike.

    May 18, 2021

    Became and Michael like this.
    1. Finish

      Dry meadows and heaths, bare rocks and sun-tanned slopes - drought is poison for some animal and plant species, but an opportunity for others. The species-rich dry meadows in the Aargau Jura Park offer a unique habitat for rare flora and fauna. Here you will meet a colorful variety of insects, hares and foxes and you can enjoy rare orchids.In the Jurapark you go on the traces of contemporary history: In addition to sea floods and mountain folds long, long ago, storms, erosion and periods of drought shape the landscape to this day. The tour starts at Stein-Säckingen train station near Bad Säckingen. From here you climb steadily uphill into the Geopark. Stop now and then and enjoy the view as far as the Black Forest.On the jungle path you pass a forest that was left to its own devices after storm Lothar in 1999. A very ancient experience! Over the Tiersteinberg it goes up to a lovingly furnished fireplace with a breathtaking view - and at the same time the highlight of the round. All around you you come across suntanned pine trees.A detour takes you to the impressive ruins of Alt-Tierstein Castle, which was inhabited from the 11th to the 15th century. It is believed that it was partially destroyed by an earthquake in the 14th century. Then you hike a few meters up and from here always flat, but tending towards downhill back to Bad Säckingen.

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      • May 18, 2021

  10. Finish planned a hike.

    May 18, 2021

    Heidi, Became and Michael like this.
    1. Finish

      It was only a year ago that dry cracks formed on the ground and numerous boats lay on dry land. Little snow in the winter months and a lack of precipitation in the spring months led to a dramatic drop in the water level of Switzerland's largest reservoir, the Sihlsee, in April 2020 - a deadly threat to fish and other aquatic organisms. With the construction of the reservoir in 1932, numerous flat and raised bogs in the region were drained. Now the lake itself is affected.On this tour you start at Einsiedeln train station and take a detour to the monastery, which made the place really famous. After all, it is a place of pilgrimage on the Camino de Santiago. Then it goes down to the bank of the Sihlsee. In summer it is a popular spot for surfers and sailing enthusiasts. Of course, this always requires a certain water level.Along its shore you hike until just before the impressive Viaduktstrasse, which extends over the lake. Then you climb up into the monastery forest. From up here you have another nice view of the landscape. In the forest you will always find rest areas with fire pits. A romantic idea for after work. However, this also stands and falls with increasing drought. Use is not permitted if there is an increased risk of forest fires.Over a couple of serpentines it goes back down to Einsiedeln, past the monastery again and back to the train station, where the tour ends.

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      • May 18, 2021

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