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Stage 11: Dufton to Alston — Pennine Way

Stage 11: Dufton to Alston — Pennine Way

Difficult
09:11
19.4 mi
2.1 mph
2,875 ft
2,575 ft
Expert Hiking Tour. Very good fitness required. Easily-accessible paths. Suitable for all skill levels.

Tour Overview

Starting Point
5.95 mi
© OSM

Great Dun Fell

Hiking Highlight

8.06 mi
© OSM

Cross Fell

Hiking Highlight

9.80 mi
© OSM

Greg's Hut Bothy

Hiking Highlight

19.4 mi
Destination

Map

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Tour Profile

Waytypes

Hiking Path: 2.11 mi
Path: 16.7 mi
Street: < 109 yd
Road: 0.57 mi

Surfaces

Unpaved: 0.44 mi
Paved: 0.76 mi
Unknown: 18.2 mi

Weather Forecast

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komoot planned a hike.

May 28, 2019

Comments

  • komoot

    This stage is one of the most challenging on the entire trail. Taking you to the highest point in the Pennines, Cross Fell, get ready for wind, weather and paths that disappear in the heather.

    Before you attempt this stage, check the weather forecast and make sure you have adequate clothing, compass, map and charge on your device. England’s strongest wind gust and coldest temperature have been recorded along this stage, so preparation is essential.

    It is also worth noting that the fells on this stage were mined. As such, venturing too far off the path could be dangerous, making good navigation doubly important.

    It is a long climb out of Dufton to start the day. After six miles of climbing, you reach Great Dun Fell, the second-highest point in the Pennines and home to the Civil Aviation Authority’s air traffic control radar domes.

    The trail undulates, climbing slightly, to reach Cross Fell, the highest point in the Pennines. From the summit, you are afforded breathtaking views of the Lake District, the west coast and also the east coast. On a clear day, the southern uplands of Scotland and the Cheviots can also be seen.

    Around one mile (one-and-a-half kilometers) later, you arrive at England’s highest bothy, Greg’s Hut. The free-to-use cottage is situated in a remote part of the hills that are prone to bad weather. There are basic facilities at the bothy and it makes for a good emergency overnight stop if the weather closes in.

    Navigation around this area can be difficult, even when the weather is good. Make sure you are vigilant and prepared with numerous methods of navigation.

    From there, it is a long but gradual descent to Garrigil. Whilst the never-ending Corpse Road miners’ track can be a little monotonous, at least navigation is simple.

    The trail is mainly flat for the rest of the hike; passing through patchwork fields all the way to Alston, which has a good range of places to eat, drink, and stay.

    • May 28, 2019

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Stage 11: Dufton to Alston — Pennine Way