Hiking the 282 munro mountains of Scotland in 95 routes

Hiking Collection by Adventurer Nic

During the summer of 2019 I hiked to the summit of all 282 mountains over 3,000 feet (914.4 m), termed as Munros, in the Scottish Highlands with my peak bagging boyfriend James. This was the experience of a lifetime – I relished in the planning of 95 Munro bagging routes. The result was a mixture of single day and multi-day Tours in the most magnificent mountainous setting.

Venturing out in all weathers, we hiked both on well-trodden paths and over pathless, remote, unforgiving terrain. River crossings made for an additional challenge and a handful of routes incorporated mountain biking with hiking. We embraced wild camping and bothy stays on 75 nights.

We enjoyed exhilarating scrambling on the Black Cuillin, Aonach Eagach ridge, CMD Arete and Liathach in Torridon, and endured brutally long but memorable hikes through Knoydart, the Fisherfields and the Cairngorms – where every footstep helped to crank up the overall kilometre and ascent total.

Here I share all of my Tours, together with summit Highlights, so that fellow peak baggers and hill walkers alike can use them as a planning resource.

On The Map

Tours & Highlights

    03:37
    4.32 mi
    1.2 mph
    2,725 ft
    2,600 ft

    192/282Ben Hope 3,041 feet (927 m)This mountain is the most northerly Munro in Scotland and we hiked to the summit on a really blustery day. Earlier that same morning we'd hiked up Ben Klibreck, the second most northerly Munro. Sadly we didn't get any views from the summit of Ben Hope but on a better weather day you'll enjoy beautiful views to Kyle of Tongue, Ben Loyal, Loch Hope and the Orkney Islands. Walkers approach from the south, but there are some climbing routes on the north and northwest faces and gullies.Read more of my tales from this outing at adventurernic.com/ben-hope-munro-route

    02:26
    6.00 mi
    2.5 mph
    2,300 ft
    2,275 ft

    191 of 282Ben Klibreck 3,156 feet (962 m)This was a very windswept day Munro bagging in the far north of Scotland across pathless and rugged terrain. It's achievable for fit hill walkers to tackle both this route and the Ben Hope route in a single day as we did. The biggest obstacle to this route is the river crossing right at the beginning, wet feet were an inevitability for me (skilfully crossing stepping stones is not my forte)! Read more from this outing at - adventurernic.com/ben-klibreck-munro-route

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  • 07:37
    11.0 mi
    1.4 mph
    3,375 ft
    3,375 ft

    220-221 of 282Conival 3,238 feet (987 m)
    Ben More Assynt 3,274 feet (998 m)
    This was a great Munro bagging day in the historic county of Sutherland in the north of Scotland. Starting and finishing the walk on the Cape Wrath Trail, we walked this route on a cloudy September day in the Scottish Highlands.

    Despite the misty conditions, the views over Loch Assynt (to our wild camping spot beside Ardvreck Castle from the previous night) were stunning.
    Look out for the heart shaped lochan whilst enjoying the wonderfully airy ridge traverse between the two Munros.Read more of my tales from this outing at - adventurernic.com/ben-more-assynt-conival-munro-route

    05:47
    13.7 mi
    2.4 mph
    2,300 ft
    2,300 ft

    265 of 282Seana Bhraigh 3,038 feet (926 m)This was a wonderfully remote walk to bag a solitary Munro. Some combine routes 4 and 5, maybe with a wild camp but we wanted to incorporate a stay at the Schoolhouse Bothy to the north. Approaching Seana Bhraigh from this direction involves a couple of river crossings so be prepared to get your feet wet!Read more tales from this adventure at - adventurernic.com/seana-bhraigh-munro-route

    08:07
    18.3 mi
    2.2 mph
    5,400 ft
    4,575 ft

    251-255 of 282Eididh nan Clach Geala 3,041 feet (927 m)
    Meall nan Ceapraichean 3,205 feet (977 m)
    Beinn Dearg 3,556 feet (1,084 m)
    Cona’ Mheall 3,209 feet (978 m)
    Am Faochagach 3,127 feet (953 m)
    Here are five Munros that aren’t commonly walked together as many walk Am Faochagach on a separate outing.Look out for Rock Ptarmigan on Meall nan Ceapraichean, we saw plenty of these ground nesting birds in October. The river crossing at the end can be tricky so make sure you don't attempt this route after a heavy rainfall. It’s a linear walk so two cars at either end of the route are required.Read more about this peak bagging hike at - adventurernic.com/eididh-nan-clach-geala-munro-route

    05:22
    10.2 mi
    1.9 mph
    3,225 ft
    3,250 ft

    228-229 of 282Sgurr Fiona 3,471 feet (1,058 m)
    Bidein a’Ghlas Thuill 3,484 feet (1,062 m)
    This was one of my most memorable Munro bagging outings. An Teallach is arguably the most dramatic and stunning mountain on mainland Britain. We were lucky enough to hike the route in the best possible weather conditions. As a result I want to return to walk this route again and again.Experienced scramblers who are comfortable down-climbing in exposed positions tackle the pinnacles (up to grade 3 in technicality) while hill walkers can take the bypass route to the west.Read more about my experience bagging these two Munros at - adventurernic.com/an-teallach-munro-route

    12:43
    27.3 mi
    2.1 mph
    6,675 ft
    6,675 ft

    230-234 of 282Sgurr Ban 3,244 feet (989 m)
    Mullach Coire Mhic Fhearchair 3,343 feet (1,019 m)
    Beinn Tarsuinn 3,074 feet (937 m)
    A’Mhaighdean 3,172 feet (967 m)
    Ruadh Stac Mor 3,011 feet (918 m)
    These five Munros make up the Fisherfield round, previously the Fisherfield Six, when Beinn a’ Chlaidheimh was also a Munro (now relegated). Walk this route and you will stand on the most remote Munro on the whole list of 282 3,000 foot mountains in the classification (A’ Mhaighean). Look out for the tennis court shaped slanted slab of rock on the ridge next to Beinn Tarsuinn. Note: most walk this route over multiple days, camping by the river or staying at Shenavall bothy.Read more from this Munro outing here - adventurernic.com/fisherfield-munro-route

    09:35
    23.3 mi
    2.4 mph
    5,800 ft
    5,825 ft

    256-264 of 282A’Chailleach 3,271 feet (997 m)
    Sgurr Bhreac 3,278 feet (999 m)
    Sgurr nan Each 3,028 feet (923 m)
    Sgurr nan Clach Geala 3,586 feet (1,093 m)
    Meall a’Chrasgaidh 3,064 feet (934 m)
    Sgurr Mor 3,635 feet (1,108 m)
    Beinn Liath Mhor Fannaich 3,129 feet (954 m)
    Meall Gorm 3,114 feet (949 m)
    An Coileachan 3,028 feet (923 m)
    It is possible for a very fit hill walker to hike all nine Fannaichs in a single day but we chose to do it over two days, with a wild camp close to Meall a' Chrasgaidh.It was a tough 37.4 kilometre hike from west to east in a real mixture of weather conditions. It should be noted that this is linear route and requires the use of two cars at either end.Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    06:27
    8.93 mi
    1.4 mph
    2,800 ft
    2,800 ft

    222 of 282Ben Wyvis 3,432 feet (1,046 m)An isolated Munro, Ben Wyvis is most commonly climbed on its own from Garbat. I remember the lower paths in the woodland were full of mushrooms!This route takes you up via An Cabar (the south west ridge). Ben Wyvis has a good path so it's a great Munro for beginners.Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    08:05
    12.0 mi
    1.5 mph
    3,150 ft
    3,150 ft

    190 of 282Slioch 3,218 feet (981 m)South of the Fisherfield round, we climbed this Munro on its own from Kinlochewe. The views of Loch Maree from Slioch are enchanting. Your eye is pulled to awesome mountain vistas from all angles on the summit. To the southwest you can enjoy views of the Torridon Munros. Whilst looking northeast over Lochan Fada you can also see the Fisherfield Munros. Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    04:03
    5.94 mi
    1.5 mph
    2,375 ft
    2,350 ft

    187 of 282Fionn Bheinn 3,061 feet (933 m)This was quite honestly one of the wettest days I’ve ever had on a mountain! On a good day, views of the Fannaichs over to the north east are stunning. But as the route is very non-technical, it’s often recommended as a Munro to hike on a poor weather day so that's what we did during our Munro round. I'll be returning another time to see the views!This straightforward route is also good for beginners.Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    06:48
    10.1 mi
    1.5 mph
    3,275 ft
    3,125 ft

    193-194 of 282Ruadh Stac Mor 3,314 feet (1,010 m)
    Spidean Coire nan Clach 3,061 feet (993 m)
    If the weather is fine, the Torridon hills is one of the best places to head to in all of the Scottish Highlands. I particularly enjoyed the view across Loch Coire Mhic Fhearchair to the Triple Buttress of Coinneach Mhor. Also look out for the resident stag who likes to hang out in the car park. It should be noted that this is a linear route and requires the use of two cars at either end (or a walk along the road).Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    05:59
    6.75 mi
    1.1 mph
    3,075 ft
    3,075 ft

    195-196 of 282Tom na Gruagaich 3,025 feet (922 m)
    Sgurr Mhor 3,235 feet (986 m)
    This was one of my favourite hiking days in the north west Highlands. My face on the summit of the first Munro Tom na Gruagaich says it all!I enjoyed scrambling on the Horns of Alligin (up to Grade 1 with some exposure). The views of the surrounding hills from these Munros are simply outstanding.Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    04:55
    6.81 mi
    1.4 mph
    3,275 ft
    3,300 ft

    188-189 of 282Spidean a’ Choire Leith 3,461 feet (1,055 m)
    Mullach an Rathain 3,356 feet (1,023 m)
    This is another of my favourite routes in the Scottish Highlands. Starting and finishing at two different points along the A896, these Munros are connected by one of the most dramatic ridges in Britain. Hikers tackling this route should be comfortable scrambling up to Grade 2 in exposed positions.The views of the surrounding hills in this area are some of the best Scotland has to offer. I literally jumped for joy on the ridge. Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    09:07
    15.2 mi
    1.7 mph
    5,050 ft
    5,125 ft

    235-237 of 282Beinn Liath Mhor 3,038 feet (926 m)
    Sgorr Ruadh 3,156 feet (962 m)
    Maol Cheann-dearg 3,061 feet (933 m)
    This was a surprising outing for me. We started off in the clag on the first Munro with limited views. But the weather cleared as the day progressed and I have some amazing memories of this Tour. The views to the Torridon hills are simply wonderful.Note: this route involves scrambling up a grassy/loose scree gully onto Maol Cheann-dearg from an unconventional hill walking angle. More often than not Maol Cheann-dearg is climbed separately from Beinn Liath Mhor and Sgorr Ruadh because to link them involves a lot of descent and re-ascent over pathless ground. It should also be noted that this is a linear route and requires the use of two cars at either end.Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    12:49
    27.0 mi
    2.1 mph
    9,750 ft
    10,025 ft

    266-271 of 282Moruisg 3,045 feet (928 m)
    Maoile Lunndaidh 3,304 feet (1,007 m)
    Sgurr a’ Chaorachain 3,455 feet (1,053 m)
    Sgurr Choinnich 3,278 feet (999 m)
    Bidein a’ Choire Sheasgaich 3,100 feet (945 m)
    Lurg Mhor 3,235 feet (986 m)
    These six Munros can be rather awkward to access and connect up. We climbed Moruisg first, followed by Maoile Lunndaidh before staying overnight in the simple non-MBA bothy shelter by Glenuaig Lodge.The second day was long and arduous but ended in a fun crossing of the wire bridge over the Allt a’ Chaonais. It should be noted that this is a linear route and requires the use of two cars at either end.Read more tales from this outing at adventurernic.com/lurg-mhor-munro-route

    07:01
    15.2 mi
    2.2 mph
    3,650 ft
    3,725 ft

    238-241 of 282Sgurr na Ruaidhe 3,258 feet (993 m)
    Carn nan Gobhar 3,255 feet (992 m)
    Sgurr a’ Choire Ghlais 3,553 feet (1,083 m)
    Sgurr Fhuar-thuill 3,442 feet (1,049 m)
    These four Munros are very difficult to access. You first have to take into account the gated entrance to the road the leads to the start point of the walk. Access to Glen Strathfarrar is limited to 25 vehicles per day so it’s best to arrive early to ensure access. The opening hours vary throughout the year so it’s important to check the up to date opening hours before attempting to gain access. Gatekeeper tel: 01463 761260.Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    11:33
    27.0 mi
    2.3 mph
    8,025 ft
    7,950 ft

    242-250 of 282Carn nan Gobhar 3,255 feet (992 m)
    Sgurr na Lapaich 3,773 feet (1,150 m)
    An Riabhachan 3,704 feet (1,129 m)
    An Socach 3,507 feet (1,069 m)
    Beinn Fhionnlaidh 3,297 feet (1,005 m)
    Mam Sodhail 3,875 feet (1,181 m)
    Carn Eige 3,881 feet (1,183 m)
    Tom a’ Choinich 3,648 feet (1,112 m)
    Toll Creagach 3,458 feet (1,054 m)
    A natural circuit around Loch Mullardoch, it sounds fairly straightforward, but as these Munros are less frequented than others, there’s still a lot of pathless hiking involved. There’s also a river crossing at the western end of Loch Mullardoch which should be undertaken with caution. We walked this route over 2 days, wild camping half way around.Read more tales from this outing here adventurernic.com/loch-mullardoch-munros-route

    07:57
    14.5 mi
    1.8 mph
    4,575 ft
    4,575 ft

    147-148 of 282Beinn Fhada 3,386 feet (1,032 m)
    A’Ghlas-bheinn 3,012 feet (918 m)
    I hiked these two Munros from Morvich and it was a great 23.3 kilometre day out in the mountains in good weather. The views from Beinn Fhada (also known as Ben Attow) were stunning. Beinn Fhada is a bulky mountain with one random large block of quartz on the north west ridge. A perfect lunch spot.Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    22:09
    38.8 mi
    1.8 mph
    12,475 ft
    11,700 ft

    132-143 of 282Sgurr Fhuaran 3501 feet (1,067 m)
    Sgurr na Carnach 3,287 feet (1,002 m)
    Sgurr na Ciste Duibhe 3,369 feet (1,027 m)
    Saileag 3,136 feet (956 m)
    Sgurr a’ Bhealaich Dheirg 3,399 feet (1,036 m)
    Aonach Meadhoin 3,284 feet (1,001 m)
    Ciste Dhubh 3,212 feet (979 m)
    Sgurr nan Ceathreamhnan 3,776 feet (1,151 m)
    Mullach na Dheiragain 3,222 feet (982 m)
    An Socach 3,021 feet (921 m)
    Mullach Fraoch-choire 3,615 feet (1,102 m)
    A’Chralaig 3,675 feet (1,120 m)
    These 12 Munros can be connected using Camban bothy as a base for two nights (with three full days of walking). The first day covers the mountains north of Glen Shiel known as the Five Sisters (and Three Brothers) of Kintail. The sunset we experienced descending from Ciste Dhubh was out of this world. On the second day we ventured to the three Munros north of Glen Affric. Before returning to civilisation via Mullach Fraoch-choire and A’Chralaig in the wet.It should be noted that this is not only a multi-day route but a linear route and so requires the use of two cars at either end.Read more from this peak bagging outing at - adventurernic.com/camban-bothy-munro-route

    06:36
    11.0 mi
    1.7 mph
    3,525 ft
    3,500 ft

    144-146 of 282Carn Ghluasaid 3,140 feet (957 m)
    Sgurr nan Conbhairean 3,638 feet (1,109 m)
    Sail Chaorainn 3,287 feet (1,002 m)
    These three Munros above Loch Cluanie are often climbed as a trio from the A87. They sit at the eastern end of the north side of Glen Shiel. Peak baggers are spoilt for choice in Glen Shiel, with Munro bagging options on both the north and south ridges.Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    06:16
    9.33 mi
    1.5 mph
    2,875 ft
    2,900 ft

    197-199 of 282Bruach na Frithe 3,143 feet (958 m)
    Am Basteir 3,064 feet (934 m)
    Sgurr nan Gillean 3,163 feet (964 m)
    I climbed these three Munros in a single day with a mountain guide who lives on Skye and works on the ridge. If you have no alpine mountaineering experience or local knowledge of the Black Cuillin you should not attempt this route without employing the services of a guide or more experienced climbing partner.The rock is highly magnetic, meaning compass readings cannot be relied upon and sections like the ‘bad step’ on Am Basteir should not be attempted without a rope unless you are experienced. The nickname for Am Basteir is ‘The Executioner’.Read Munro tales like this here adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    05:53
    8.39 mi
    1.4 mph
    4,350 ft
    4,400 ft

    202-204 of 282Sgurr a’Mhadaidh 3,012 feet (918 m)
    Sgurr Ghreadaidh 3,192 feet (973 m)
    Sgurr na Banachdaich 3,166 feet (965 m)
    I climbed these three Munros in a single day with a mountain guide who lives on Skye and works on the ridge. If you have no alpine mountaineering experience or local knowledge of the Black Cuillin you should not attempt this route without employing the services of a guide or more experienced climbing partner.The rock is highly magnetic, meaning compass readings cannot be relied upon and the sections to gain access to Sgurr a’Mhadaidh and Sgurr Ghreadaidh from An Dorus, should not be attempted without a rope unless you are experienced. We descended an unconventional route off Sgurr na Banachdaich, an easier route would be via Coir’ an Eich.Read Munro tales like this here - adventurernic.com/munro-routes

    05:20
    6.29 mi
    1.2 mph
    2,975 ft
    2,925 ft

    223-224 of 282Sgurr Mhic Choinnich 3,110 feet (948 m)
    The Inaccessible Pinnacle 3,235 feet (986 m)
    By far the most surprising and memorable Munro bagging outing that I have ever undertaken. I climbed these two Munros in a single day with a mountain guide who lives on Skye and works on the ridge.If you have no alpine mountaineering experience or local knowledge of the Black Cuillin you should not attempt this route without employing the services of a guide or more experienced climbing partner. The rock is highly magnetic, meaning compass readings cannot be relied upon and I was roped up for sections of both of these climbs (over the damp slabs of Sgurr Mhic Choinnich and for the ‘moderate’ graded climb of the ‘In Pinn’).Putting safety concerns aside, we climbed these mountains above a perfect marshmallow-like cloud inversion, saw a brocken spectre and abseiled off the summit of the In Pinn in the best possible conditions (the one and only Munro where the best feasible option is to abseil from a summit).Read Munro tales like this hereadventurernic.com/munro-routes

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Collection Stats

  • Tours
    98
  • Distance
    1,306 mi
  • Duration
    700:52 h
  • Elevation
    368,900 ft