From Prussia to the fall of the Berlin Wall – by S-Bahn along the history of Berlin

Collection by S-Bahn Berlin

"Welcome, ladies and gentlemen. So, you are interested in the history of our federal capital, right? What do you say? Yes, exactly, the gentleman with the camera around his neck. Checkpoint Charlie, Brandenburger Tor, Fernsehturm and East-Side-Gallery have you seen yet? Well great, even a blind guy can find it without help. But for today I prepared myself a little longer and will take the dear gentlemen with me on a journey through the history of Berlin. And because all abut Berlin started with Prussia becoming a major European power, we also want you to start with the fine Prussian electors. And from there I lead you in zigzag through the troubled past, along the imperial era and on to the Weimar Republic. Unfortunately ick can't tell the story of Berlin without Hitler's brown ragtag and the war he started, but I try to keep it short at this point. After that we'll all see double, because now it divides into West and East. But as you can imagine a good story needs a happy ending, and our ending is the fall of the Berlin wall. So I'd say, everybody hold on and our journey through time can begin."

Our Berlin tour guide will take you on eight tours on which you will experience the history of Berlin from Prussia to the fall of the Berlin Wall. You will discover the legacy of the Prussian kings in Charlottenburg Palace and Berlin's Tiergarten. At the Reichstag several epochs from the founding of the German Reich to the Weimar Republic, past the Nazi regime and on to Berlin as the new federal capital are bundled together. At Tempelhof Airport, you walk along the taxiways on which the raisin bombers landed. At the Soviet memorial you commemorate the brave Russian soldiers who lost their lives fighting Hitler's Germany. And on Karl-Marx-Allee you'll be impressed by the GDR workers' palaces. The tour concludes with a visit to the Wall Memorial at Bernauer Strasse, where the divided Berlin comes to life once again.

To get to our tours, you need nothing more than a S-Bahn ticket, because all hikes begin and end at S-Bahn stations. Now all you have to do is choose the epoch you are most interested in and your discovery tour can begin.

On The Map

Tours & Highlights

  • Easy
    01:12
    2.93 mi
    2.4 mph
    50 ft
    50 ft
    Easy hike. Great for any fitness level. Easily-accessible paths. Suitable for all skill levels.

    "Look, gentlemen, look. Here, in the famous Schloss Charlottenburg, the jute Elector Frederick I and King in Prussia, his old, so the Sophie Charlotte, abjeschoben. The beidn would not always be green when se vastehn wat ick my. Well, at least the jute electorate had the decency to rename the castle of Lietzenburg in Charlottenburg after the death of the charming wife. His son, on the other hand, King Frederick William, could not do anything with his wife's ancestral court life. The Charlottenburg Palace had ersma jejma and the king took care of the public finances and his army. Only the grandson, our old Fritz, was able to make friends with the Schlössken. He then had the hut officially opened and what has come out of it could still be admired today. "Your tour to the Charlottenburg Palace begins at Jungfernheide S-Bahn station, which is served by the ring-train lines S41 and S42. From the train station, drive over the river Spree and you will enter the spacious Schlosspark Charlottenburg. In the northern part you walk over beautiful meadows and under big trees. After passing the Belvedere Palace, the route will take you along the carp pond to the magnificent, geometrically designed castle garden. The view of Charlottenburg Castle is particularly beautiful from here.Now turn left around the castle. At the main entrance on the front you can still shoot a nice souvenir photo or visit the interiors of the castle. Diagonally across the street from the former orangery is a cozy café-restaurant. Afterwards it goes around the castle again and through the castle park back to the station Jungfernheide.

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  • Easy
    01:17
    3.13 mi
    2.4 mph
    75 ft
    75 ft
    Easy hike. Great for any fitness level. Easily-accessible paths. Suitable for all skill levels.

    "Well, here's where the next destination arrived: the Tiergarten. In the old days only the janz fine society was allowed to enter the park. The Prussian electors and kings fight here with their posh fiends on hunting - and the remaining Berlin puked in tube. Today there are still some traces of the time here: marble sculptures by Queen Luise or even the names of the paths. And at the other end of the Tiergarten is already the Reichstag. The Emperor had tapped him here when Otto von Bismarck had convinced him that one had to offer the German people a bit of democracy. Well, during the imperial era, the people's representatives with the Reichstag were actually just calmly. But after the First World War, Philipp Scheidemann took the opportunity to proclaim the republic from the west balcony of the building. In the Weimar Republic, it was then time for the first time to properly palaver - until Hitler marched with his henchmen. Anyone who sets fire to the Reichstag at the end of the day will probably not know what to expect, but one thing is for sure: Dat brown men knew how to use the fire for his plans. The rest is probably history. "The starting point of your tour is the Bellevue train station, which is served by the S-Bahn lines S3, S5, S7 and S9. From here you pass the Academy of Arts and enter the English Garden. Here you can take a break in the cozy tea house. Shortly afterwards you are standing at the big star in front of a Berlin landmark: the Victory Column with the Gold Else. The column was erected in honor of the German victories in the German-Danish War, in the German war against Austria and in the German-French War. Actually, the pillar was originally opposite the Reichstag, but the megalomaniac Albert Speer had the pillar in the context of the conversion of Berlin to the world capital Germania implement.From the Big Star, you stroll comfortably through the picturesque Tiergarten and across the small Luiseninsel. After your round through the park, you will cross the street of the 17th of June and stand a little later in front of the Reichstag building. However, if you want to visit the impressive glass dome, you must register in advance on the website of the Bundestag (bundestag.de/besuche/kuppel-dachterrasseunddachgartenrestaurant).From the Reichstag you follow our route along the banks of the Spree to the Friedrichstrasse S-Bahn station. From here it goes back home with the lines S1, S2, S25, S26, S3, S5, S7 and S9.

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  • Easy
    01:44
    4.25 mi
    2.4 mph
    50 ft
    50 ft
    Easy hike. Great for any fitness level. Easily-accessible paths. Suitable for all skill levels.

    "Here in the north of Berlin hides a pretty Schlössken with a particularly varied history. The old Fritz had bequeathed the place to his dear Queen Elisabeth Christine in 1740 and from that time spent all her summers out here botany. As you say, the king has passed nüscht once - the lady was probably just right. After their death, the fine kings knew how to make a nice start with the castle and let it jingle. Only in the Weimar Republic did a few builders lace around the ailing substance. Ironically, under Hitler's henchmen, the castle was then again finely cleaned out. And for what: so that've been able to store the "degenerate art" here. For the sale abroad, the works were just barely enough, and besides, the scoundrels could then pocket their bags. Later, the GDR superiors tore the lock under their nails. First there was the president of the state and later high-ranking foreigners. Today you can walk around in the castle and in the park and revel in the memory of old times. "Starting point of the tour is the S-Bahn station Wollankstraße, which is approached by the lines S1, S25 and S26. First you stroll through the small Bürgerpark Pankow and then through a quiet residential area to the castle park Niederschönhausen. It's worth taking a stroll through the park before visiting the castle and its exhibition. Before you go back to the train station, you can stop for a coffee and cake in Café Sommerlust. From here you walk along the Tschaikowskistraße to the Volkspark Schönholzer Heide and on to the S-Bahn station Schönholz. From here the S-Bahn S1, S25 and S26 take you back to the city.

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  • Easy
    01:22
    3.34 mi
    2.4 mph
    50 ft
    50 ft
    Easy hike. Great for any fitness level. Easily-accessible paths. Suitable for all skill levels.

    "If I'm to introduce you to Berlin's history, then of course I can skip the darkest chapters: the NS regime and the Second World War. Today I have decided for this variant: In the midst of the Treptower Park hides a huge monument, namely the Soviet War Memorial. Only a few years after the war, the GDR government put a dignified monument to the fallen Red Army soldiers. Stone flags, a statue of a suffering mother and two kneeling soldiers and a monumental soldier with a sword and a child on his arm are enthroned above. Slightly thick, sajen se? Not so fat when they know there are over 7,000 Russian soldiers buried here. So walk in a little respect over the place and drown the dead. "Your tour starts at the S-Bahn station Treptower Park, which you can reach with the S-Bahn lines S8, S85, S9 and the Ringbahn lines S41 and S42. You leave the station in the direction of the park and shortly thereafter cross the Puschkinallee. On the edge of a wide meadow, you stroll to the stone entrance portal of the Soviet Memorial. Give yourself plenty of time to absorb the special atmosphere of the place.Afterwards, the path leads along the carp pond to the Spreeufer in Treptower Park. Several restaurants invite you to take a break here. Along the shore you finally walk back to the S-Bahn station Treptower Park.

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  • Intermediate
    02:06
    5.10 mi
    2.4 mph
    100 ft
    100 ft
    Intermediate Hiking Tour. Good fitness required. Easily-accessible paths. Suitable for all skill levels.

    "The history of raisin bombers is probably one of the most touching from the postwar period. Just recently, the GIs bombarded the German cities with bombs and now it's time for cross-national cohesion. Because the Western powers had put together their zones in Berlin just as well and without questions, the Russians have shut down - and Berlin as well. The western districts got nüschts more: no food, no coal, no medication. The only change: over the sky. In no time at all an airlift was set up and from West Germany flew every minute American and British transport planes de urgently needed Fressalien to Berlin. And because jab for the kids and sweetet, you quickly got a new nickname for the plane: raisin bomber. Over a year, the supplies were flown in and the starving West Berlin alive. Perhaps the best way to reconcile Germans and Americans after the war. "The starting point for your round over the Tempelhofer Feld is the Tempelhof S-Bahn station, which you can reach by taking the S41, S42, S45 and S46 lines. From here you cross the Tempelhofer Damm and then you already stand on the wide area of the old airfield. If you are standing here for the first time on the old runway, it will make you speechless at the sight. But do not dream, because racing cyclists, inline skaters, skateboarders and unicyclists rush past you on the tarmac. On the meadows between the runways, people lie in the sun, picnicking, playing and making music - a great atmosphere.You leave the airfield at the Columbiadamm and reach the place of the airlift and the old airport terminal a little later. From here it goes through the cozy aviation district with its garden city center back to the S-Bahn Tempelhof.

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  • Intermediate
    02:28
    6.05 mi
    2.5 mph
    50 ft
    50 ft
    Intermediate Hiking Tour. Good fitness required. Easily-accessible paths. Suitable for all skill levels.

    "If you go with me to the south of Berlin, then in the spring you can marvel at a very special avenue. Right on the border with Brandenburg, the Berlin Wall ran until 1989. On the old border post the wall can run completely once. Or just a piece, as we have today jeplant ham. Namely, we decided on the foljenden section: From Lichterfelde, Japanese cherry trees adorn both sides of the Wall. How come they come here, you ask? The Japanese TV station Asahi made a call for donations in far-away Japan for German reunification, and cherry trees were bought with the young Jeld and transplanted along the Berlin Wall. The longest avenue can be found here today between Lichterfelde and Teltow - but also in other places in Berlin the beautiful little trees stand. "With the S-Bahn lines S25 and S26 you drive out of town to the station Lichterfelde Süd. Here is a short distance through a residential area and you reach the Berlin Wall Trail and at the same time the TV Asahi Cherry Blossom Avenue. Especially beautiful in spring, when the trees are bathed in soft pink. You follow the wall path to the south and cross the S-Bahn tracks.At the end of the Kirchbaumallee, the Mauerweg turns left and leads you on a wide view over fields and meadows on the edge of Berlin Marienfelde. The aim of the hike is the S-Bahn station Lichtenrade. Here you climb into the S2 and drive back to the city.

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  • Easy
    01:57
    4.78 mi
    2.4 mph
    75 ft
    75 ft
    Easy hike. Great for any fitness level. Easily-accessible paths. Suitable for all skill levels.

    "Here on the Karl-Marx-Allee, the history of the GDR can be read off the tree like the age rings. Detlef already says yes to the name: after the founding of the GDR, the Frankfurter Allee was simply renamed Stalinallee. However, as the work of the Soviet dictator was increasingly viewed - say wa ma - more critically, the GDR officials referred to the origin of communism. What could be more appropriate than to rename the boulevard in Karl-Marx-Allee?Well, that's not all that de can discover here. Very clearly can be seen och the three stages. The Frankfurter Allee was almost completely in ruins after the war and was to be rebuilt as a new main street. Many architects have touched their fingers, I can glove. The contract was then awarded to the Bauhaus architect Hans Scharoun, who tear down all Berlin and according to his collective plan to re-design everything. Until 1950, two of his dream houses were built on the section between the street of the Paris Commune and Warschauer Strasse - the so-called arcade houses. One may or may not like the blocks, but at least Scharoun had the goal that all Berliners should get housing quickly and cheaply - socialism, ick listen to you. The two houses barely warned when Scharoun was deposed: too functionalist, too decadent, too burgeois. In addition - and det was probably the crucial point - not representative. After all, the whole world should learn that GDR socialism is superior to all other societies. And for that, the magnificent designs by Hermann Henselmann were simply better suited. Even today, the monumental buildings between Strausberger Platz and Frankfurter Tor do not lose their effect.But now the jest of the story: The buildings warn so expensive, that soon was the end with cheap living space for all. From then on, only the most loyal GDR citizens lived in the new buildings. And when it was time for the third construction phase between Strausberger Platz and Alexanderplatz, there was hardly any coal left. The only salvation were blocky, but wonderfully cheap prefabricated buildings. And Hans Scharoun, who now built the Berlin Philharmonic in the west, secretly laughed in the throat. "The starting point of your small city walk is Alexanderplatz station. The S-Bahn lines S3, S5, S7 and S9 stop here. From here it goes past the house of the teacher, also a GDR building, and you already stand on the Karl-Marx-Allee. First, the road is crossed and you stroll along the towering prefabricated buildings of the third section of construction. As a stopover, the Kino International is the place to go, because in the bar on the first floor you can drink a coffee without a ticket.After the unadorned prefabricated buildings, it will be much more magnificent at Strausberger Platz. The impressive houses are nicknamed sugar confectionery due to the richly decorated tiles, reminiscent of biscuits and cookies. Along the magnificent houses you continue on to the rose garden. At the Frankfurter Tor with its distinctive towers you change the street side and make your way back. Halfway through, you pass through the arcaded houses of Hans Scharoun, who are, however, shyly hiding behind tall poplars. At the end of the tour you will reach the S-Bahn station Alexanderplatz again.

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  • Easy
    00:57
    2.27 mi
    2.4 mph
    100 ft
    50 ft
    Easy hike. Great for any fitness level. Easily-accessible paths. Suitable for all skill levels.

    "There is not much left of Ulbricht's 'anti-Fascist protective wall'. Luckily, say it? Since ham se right, but the whole thing is now badly forgotten. And perhaps such an injustice should simply be exaggerated to your own people. This is ensured today by the Wall Memorial on Bernauer Strasse. Here you can still marvel at one and a half kilometers of the gray concrete wall that once surrounded the western part of the city as the Berlin Wall. The surveillance systems clearly show how badly the wall was guarded. And photos are reminiscent of the young East German citizens who died in their escape attempt. An important place, so that nüscht irjendwann means: 'Oh, in the GDR was et och janz ok.' "At the Nordbahnhof S-Bahn station, where lines S1, S2, S25 and S26 stop, your tour to the Berlin Wall Memorial begins. And this starts already after a few meters. Along the roughly 1.4-kilometer-long wall remnants, you can experience the life in the divided city up close on info boards and many pictures.At the Brunnenstraße you will reach the end of the memorial. Here you turn left and soon after you reach Volkspark Humboldthain. The park was opened in the 1860s and has since enjoyed great popularity with residents from the surrounding neighborhoods. During the Second World War, the Nazis erected two anti-aircraft bunkers on the grounds of the park, of which the northern one is still largely preserved. From the roof platform of the bunker, which is open to the public, you have a nice view. Afterwards you will reach Gesundbrunnen station, where you can take the S1, S2, S25, S26, S41 and S42 lines.

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Collection Stats

  • Tours
    8
  • Distance
    31.8 mi
  • Duration
    13:04 h
  • Elevation
    525 ft
From Prussia to the fall of the Berlin Wall – by S-Bahn along the history of Berlin
Collection by
S-Bahn Berlin