Epic sunset spots in Western Europe

Hiking Collection by komoot

Sunsets have something mystical about them and, for many, there is hardly a more romantic sight to behold. The moment the sun starts to dip below the horizon and throws a beautiful blanket over everything you can see — that's something truly special. In Europe, there are some spectacular places to witness this daily ritual, places that make this moment even more unique and special. And the fact that some of them are so remote you'll be the only person for miles makes the whole thing even more incredible. So, let's celebrate the beginning of new days: Here are the best sunset spots in Western Europe.

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Tours & Highlights

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    One thing in advance: you can not wait for classic sunsets north of the Arctic Circle in midsummer. But with the midnight sun, you will experience a natural spectacle of truly epic breadth on the Vesterålen archipelago. On the north-west coast of the island of Andøya, around the small village of Bleik, a bay with dazzling white sandy beaches joins the next. If the weather is mild, one would expect to be on the beach of Bleik more in the Caribbean than north of Lofoten and 300 kilometers above the Arctic Circle. If you are looking for the absolute loneliness while enjoying the midnight sun, you will leave the mostly deserted beaches, circling one of the lakes behind Bleik or climbing the cliffs with magnificent views of the North Atlantic Ocean.

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    Godrevy Head

    Hiking Highlight

    Godrevy Head at the eastern end of St Ives Bay, overlooking Godrevy Island and its lighthouse, offers one of Cornwall's most beautiful sunsets. The lighthouse on Godrevy Iceland is said to have inspired the writer Virginia Woolf to her novel "To the Lighthouse". West of Godrevy Head is a series of breathtaking beaches such as Gwithian Beach, where Atlantic waves meet at full speed.

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    The north of Ireland is rough and secluded - and gives it its own very original charm. Located in the extreme northwest of the Republic of Ireland, the Slieve League cliffs at 600 meters are among the highest sea cliffs in Europe - offering spectacular sunsets overlooking the untamed vastness of the Atlantic Ocean. The One Man's Path leads partly at dizzying heights along the cliffs and should under no circumstances be underestimated in wind and rainy weather. Those who wander here experience above all loneliness and rough, unbridled nature. Even if the sunsets here can be a special experience: Since the paths and paths are not widely developed "tourist suitable" everywhere, you should make sure that you are back in the dark.

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    Neist Point Lighthouse

    Hiking Highlight

    Viewpoint and location of the Neist Point Lighthouse on the Isle of Skye. The lighthouse itself is a bit rundown and cannot be entered, but the views are spectacular, and whales and dolphins can be spotted from here. The walk requires a lot of stamina. Great views also at sunset.

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    Daniela
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    The North Sea island of Amrum is not at the end of the world, but in one of the most beautiful corners of Germany. With the island west of Kniepsand Amrum has one of the widest sandy beaches in northern Europe. In addition to sand in all its facets, the approximately 1.5-kilometer-wide and approximately twelve-kilometer-long beach offers its visitors terrific sunsets almost every season. The Kniepsand geologically does not belong to Amrum. It is actually a huge sandbank that slowly wanders north from the island. So, if you take it very close and you really want to see the sun sinking from Amrum into the North Sea, you should head out of the beach into the unique dune landscape. Since the dunes are largely nature reserve, it is advisable to stay on the planks and the designated areas.

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    Pointe de Pen Hir

    Hiking Highlight

    Very nice - good difference in altitude - around the cape are still a few small islands. Almost at the Pointe de Penhir stands the monument Monument aux Bretons de la France Libre.

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    Jochen
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    Dune du Pilat

    Hiking Highlight

    With a height of more than a hundred meters and a length of about 2.7 kilometers, the Dune du Pilat is the largest dune in Europe - and after Mont-Saint-Michel the natural monument with the second most frequent visitors in France. Even if the dune is - quite rightly - a tourist magnet, the rise pays off in any case. The view of the sun sinking in the Atlantic Ocean is as grand as the view of the vast pine forests behind the dune or the Lège-Cap-Ferret peninsula. Since the entire dune, the underlying sandy beaches and the forests behind are extremely extensive, visitors are relatively well distributed on most days, especially since almost all areas of the dune are freely accessible. In the sea in front of the dune is the huge sandbank Banc d'Arguin. As you descend from the ridge of the dune to the Atlantic and turn left (south), you can walk down the beach for several days.

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    The 35-kilometer long beach in the National Park Coto de Doñana is a natural jewel and, with its unspoiled nature, stands in stark contrast to the usually very heavily used coasts in southern Spain. With its variety of different species and landscapes, Spain's largest national park is a biosphere reserve and UNESCO World Heritage Site. From the wide, largely untouched sandy beach with the dune landscape behind it, you can enjoy one of the most beautiful sunsets in Spain, overlooking the Gulf of Cadiz. And that, without having to share the views of the setting sun with too many people. Since the entrance to the park is heavily regulated, visitor numbers are limited even in high season. Apart from the sandy beach and some roads and paths through the dunes, you can only reach the interior of the park by means of guided tours. If you want to get to know the park or observe rare animal species, you should sign up for a tour at one of the visitor centers, especially in high season. The dune landscape and the sandy beach are just one of the attractions in the Doñana National Park - the marshes and wetlands in the mouth of the Rio Guadalquivir are for many nature lovers the real reason to visit the park.

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    The easiest way to get to Cabo de São Vicente is by using your own vehicle or one of the tourist buses that leave from the resorts of the Algarve. Parking is available just a few meters from the lighthouse complex. If you long for German cuisine, you will find a bratwurst stand in the parking area with the inscription "Last Bratwurst vor Amerika". The village Sagres is about six kilometers.

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    Cabo Fisterra

    Hiking Highlight

    Finisterre comes from the Latin "finis terrae" - meaning "end of the earth". Legends and legends surround this mystical place. For the people of antiquity and the Middle Ages, this promontory not only ended the familiar world, but at Cape Finisterre is also the unofficial endpoint of the Way of St. James. Many who see the sun sinking in the Atlantic here have sometimes traveled hundreds of kilometers on foot - the mood among the pilgrims is correspondingly unique. Already Celts and Romans erected solar altars on this wildly rugged cape, today you will find at the end of the promontory a spacious lighthouse building and the landmark marking the kilometer zero of the Way of St. James.

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