Via Ferratas – on the paths of World War One

Hiking Collection by
komoot

A little over one hundred years ago, a merciless war took place between Italy and Austria. It occurred high up on the walls of the Dolomites, a stunning theatre of Alpine peaks that served as the backdrop for this conflict. During the fighting, the Italian Alpini and the Austrian Kaiserjäger blew up entire mountains and crushed others to rubble. And even though this happened long before any of us were born, signs of this conflict are still visible today.

Back then, numerous supply routes which transported necessary goods through the mountains were literally built into the rock. Today, the routes, holds and infrastructure that was carved into the landscape live on in the form of amazing via ferratas. These lasting symbols of conflict now allow us to reach incredible places high up in the mountains, bringing us to amazing climbing walls, well maintained via ferratas and, last but not least, breathtaking scenery.

On The Map

Tours & Highlights

  • © OSM

    Kaiserjägersteig

    Mountaineering Highlight

    The Italian Alpini and the Austrian Kaiserjäger wrote the tragic history of the First World War in the Dolomites. Many of them on the mountain Lagazuoi, which makes it a kind of open air museum for war history. Many wartime positions, tunnels and bridges from the First World War have been restored here - most interesting of the rock tunnel in the mountain. Be sure to bring a flashlight and best gloves!

    The path is more suitable for experienced alpinists and leads past very well-preserved Austrian positions. Just before the insured part (A / B) of the crate, you can also go to the caves to see the original kitchen and dormitory of the soldiers of that time. Arrived at the rock it continues to be secured with wire ropes. The long suspension bridge is a real highlight here. Once at the top you can enjoy the magnificent view at 2,800 meters. Down it goes through the mountain tunnel. Very exciting.

    translated byView Original
    Tip by
    Betty
  • © OSM

    Klettersteig Ivano Dibona

    Mountaineering Highlight

    This approximately 6-7 hours long via ferrata, the category B / C, leads completely over a supply route, which used the Italians in the First World War. On the way you go over narrow layers of tape, a cool suspension bridge and climbs over beautiful ladders. The climb is very well insured. On the way there are no rest stops, so take enough water and food for 6-8 hours of climbing and walking. If you go to Ospitale, then you should either arrive with 2 cars (and one at the descent at the inn Ospitale parken) or use the good bus connections of SAD and Dolomitibus.

    translated byView Original
    Tip by
    Betty
  • Sign Up To Discover Places Like This

    Get recommendations on the best single tracks, peaks, & plenty of other exciting outdoor places.

    or
    Sign Up With Email
  • © OSM

    Cellon Stollen und Steinbergerweg

    Mountaineering Highlight

    The via ferrata on the Little Lagazuoi is very interesting from the point of view of war history and offers a lot to discover. The most demanding part is climbing through the Cellonstollen (insurance B / C). The trail climbs through the eastern ravine of the mountain to 2778 meters. It is not recommended for children, because there are some uninsured jobs. The old way of war was "rediscovered" by the researcher Walther Schaumann. Around there are also many information boards that tell the story of the Cellon in the position war.

    translated byView Original
    Tip by
    Betty
  • © OSM

    Sextener Dolomiten - Alpinisteig

    Mountaineering Highlight

    The Alpinisteig is probably one of the most famous and at the same time simplest Dolomites walk, because it is "only" category A. You should not underestimate this transition in the Sexten Dolomites but not. The Alpini, as the Italian mountain troops were called, built the trail and later it was built for us crazy mountain people. You can still find relics from that time, remains of metal, barbed wire and also bunkers that you can go into.

    The climb is for the most part a simple hike that leads over an insured rock band, but next to it goes steep and deep, so full concentration. In our case there was still some old snow in the niches. It was icy and dangerous, especially because the steel cable was often under the snow and you could not secure so. A few very "nerve-wracking" meters. Otherwise, the climb is also great for those who are free from giddiness and have a good condition. The most beautiful on the way for me is the "Cross of the Dolomites", the climb once makes a U-hook and when you stand inside and looks outside, you have a nice light-shadow game in front of him. All in all, a beautiful trail, but also requires a little fitness. Absolutely enough water and food to take, because including access and descent is already on the 9 hours on the way.

    translated byView Original
    Tip by
    Betty
  • © OSM

    Via Ferrata Fausto Susatti

    Mountaineering Highlight

    A nice easy (B) via ferrata, which impresses above all by its fantastic view over Lake Garda and its war relics. The via ferrata is also recommended for children, as it is never really difficult and consistently well secured. Already on the approach one goes again and again through old positions and trenches. Really cool, especially for kids. Since the trail is quite short and there are still others nearby, you can combine this great and make it an all-round climbing experience.

    translated byView Original
    Tip by
    Betty
  • © OSM

    Sentiero delle Laste

    Mountaineering Highlight

    A nice, easy (A / B) via ferrata which lies on the south side and is also great for children as an entry point. For children and beginners, a KS set is recommended, very experienced mountaineers do not necessarily need. A helmet is of course always mandatory. The path leads up to the chapel "San Giovanni" and is also very well connected with other paths nearby. Highly recommended is the combination with "Mario Foletti" (only with via ferrata set) or the "Sentiero dei Camminamenti" (torch for the tunnel). For the climb to the chapel you should expect about 1 1/4 hours. Since the trail is south-facing and also protected from the wind, it will be very warm in April. In midsummer, walking around midday should be avoided.

    translated byView Original
    Tip by
    Betty
  • © OSM

    Klettersteig Trincee bei Arabba

    Mountaineering Highlight

    A wonderfully beautiful via ferrata with an incomparable view to the Marmolada. But he is definitely one of the heavier Dolomites. Very varied it goes from the north to the south side of the rocks and back again. On the way we will go over ridge ridges, suspension bridges and above all through some tunnels from wartime. In this via ferrata the entry wall separates the wheat from the chaff, which is a clear D-spot. The majority of the via ferrata then moves in the C / D area. But as always - if you already have a hard time with the boarding wall, let it stay, because on the way your powers will be less. The trail is mostly very well insured and the rock is grippy but there are occasional unsecured grass strips where slipping is not allowed. On the way you have two options to get out, which is especially advised in case of sudden bad weather.

    Towards the end, the trail drags a bit until you reach the Bontadini bivouac. But here you have an awesome view when you come out of the last long and impressive tunnel. After a break at the bivouac, it goes back down the normal route (No. 680). Including the ascent and descent you should expect about 8 hours of walking time, therefore take enough water with you and do not forget the headlamp for the studs.

    translated byView Original
    Tip by
    Betty
  • © OSM

    Via Ferrata Rocca Senghi

    Mountaineering Highlight

    This via ferrata has in fact no positions of the First World War but positions that were intended for the Second World War. At the summit at 2,450 meters there is a position that has never been used. The D-ferrata was built in 2003 and leads beautifully landscaped with a lot of air to the war tunnel on the exit. Be sure to bring a headlamp with you, then you can climb through the mountain on the "Galleria" secured with iron treads and steel rope. The via ferrata also has an escape route "Via di fuga", which will bring you down safely in case of a fall.

    translated byView Original
    Tip by
    Betty
  • © OSM

    The De Luca-Innerkofler-Steig (Difficulty B) was built in the First World War and leads several hundred meters through the interior of the mountain. Here you definitely need a headlamp, because sometimes the studs are pitch dark. Leave the main tunnel at the fourth rock window and head for the actual via ferrata, which is mostly secured with a steel cable and leads you almost to the summit cross of the Paternkofel. The last meters you go over a boulder field. From the summit you have a perfect view of the famous north walls of the Drei Zinnen. Breathtaking. Because of the Three Peaks, the adjoining Auronzo hut and the ingenious climb itself, this is of course often overrun. Just a madness experience.

    translated byView Original
    Tip by
    Betty
  • © OSM

    Ferrata Giovanni Lipella

    Mountaineering Highlight

    I went last year - really great! From the tunnel there are two exits. None of them are marked, but both lead back together on the "right" way. So you can not go wrong.

    translated byView Original
    Tip by
    Klaus

You Might Also Like

Your first 3000m peak
Hiking Collection by
komoot
On mule tracks from Binntal to Italy
Hiking Collection by
komoot