Hike the beauty of the outdoor city — Sheffield

Hiking Collection by
The Outdoor City Sheffield

Less than five miles from Sheffield's cosmopolitan city centre lies the Peak District. The first national park to be formed in the UK, the Peak District boasts myriad hiking opportunities; from heather moorland to rolling hills, lush pastures to deep valleys, ancient woodland to gentle rivers, quaint villages to remote farmsteads and much more.

However, it is not just the Peaks that makes Sheffield the UK's leading destination for outdoor adventure, city culture and rural escapes. In fact, Sheffield is surrounded by picturesque countryside on every side, all rich in history and heritage. It is no wonder that the great outdoors is in the DNA of the city and people, then.

This Collection introduces you to the wonderful landscape that is Sheffield’s garden. In these routes, you explore the wild and wonderful landscape around Derwent Dam and Ladybower, hike deep into the moorland above the city, saunter through beautiful ancient woodland that was almost destroyed by the industrial revolution, and ascend hillforts with the best views in the city. These routes also take you up to the summit of Mam Tor, arguably the star attraction of the Peaks, and explore the iconic Chatsworth Estate.

There is something for all abilities in the Collection, too. Whether you are looking for a relaxing hike within the city, or a full-day hike through remote countryside, you will find it here. So, lace up your boots and discover why Sheffield is officially the Outdoor City.

Public transport links are very good around Sheffield and bus services are mentioned in these routes.

For bus timetables and more information, visit: travelsouthyorkshire.com/timetablefinder.aspx.
For train timetables, visit: thetrainline.com.

On The Map

Tours & Highlights

  • Difficult
    05:09
    11.4 mi
    2.2 mph
    1,150 ft
    1,150 ft
    Expert Hiking Tour. Very good fitness required. Mostly accessible paths. Sure-footedness required.

    This glorious hike explores one of the finest areas of the Dark Peak—a wild landscape of moors, weather-shaped tors, caves, brooks and picturesque panoramas.From the quaint village of Hathersage, you saunter alongside the River Derwent, hike up the mystical Padley Gorge, over moorland to the rocky hillfort of Carl Wark, to Higger Tor with its fabulous 360-degree view and eventually to Robin Hood’s Cave, which once sheltered the infamous outlaw, according to legend.Turn right out of the car park and walk to the road junction. Cross the road, turn left and then take the first road on the right. Follow this under the railway bridge and down to the right-hand bend, where you turn left onto the path. Follow this through meadows until you emerge at Leadmill Bridge. Cross the road and continue alongside the river. As the path approaches cottages the footpath diverts to the right through a gate. Continue across riverside pastures until you enter woodland.About 164 yards (150 meters) into the woodland, bear left uphill away from the riverside path. The path exits the wood at a gate. Bear slightly right on a field path. This soon runs along the left side of a wall to a wood facing with open gateway on the right. Turn left here then keep straight ahead along the field edge, pass over a railway bridge and join a track. Turn right, pass Padley Chapel and a row of terraced houses and descend to pass the old mill. The unmade road then crosses Burbage Brook.Turn left immediately after passing over the bridge and follow the easiest and most obvious footpath up through woods with the brook on your left. After 437 yards (400 meters), descend steps to the left to cross the gorge by a footbridge. Continue uphill to join a major footpath. Turn right and follow the path above and parallel with the brook through woods, then open ground. Pass a footbridge and continue to a second.Bear left up to the main road. Cross this and the stile opposite and then fork right to climb above Toad’s Mouth rock. Continue to the rocky tor and Iron Age fort of Carl Wark, entering it by the southwest gateway. Keep straight ahead, descend from the northwest gateway and follow the path uphill to Higger Tor. The main path becomes a scramble amongst rocks but an easier option is available by bearing left to a gap in the crags. Return to the eastern edge then resume the former direction. Keep straight ahead, ignoring a left fork further on, and descend from the tor to Burbage Bridge.Cross the stile on the left into the car park, walk to the road and turn left. Continue to the left-hand bend but keep straight ahead here along the path heading for the crags of Stanage Edge. Follow the path up to the trig point and then along the top of Stanage Edge for just over one mile (two kilometers) where the stony track known as the Long Causeway cuts across the path. Follow this downhill to join the road below the edge.Turn left, cross a cattle grid and turn right immediately. Follow the path alongside the wood on Dennis Knoll. Descend to the cottages, turn left, then right and resume the descent along a path until you reach the road. Cross the road and continue along the obvious footpath, which joins a track further on leading back into Hathersage.

  • Intermediate
    01:43
    4.02 mi
    2.3 mph
    275 ft
    275 ft
    Intermediate Hiking Tour. Great for any fitness level. Mostly accessible paths. Sure-footedness required.

    The woods on this route still bear the scars of the industrial revolution; the humps, hollows and old tips pay a peculiar homage to the punishing price of progress.Thorncliffe Wood was decimated at the end of the 18th century with the building of the Newton and Chambers Ironworks, which employed over 8,000 workers by 1900. Coal for the production of coke was mined alongside ironstone for the blast furnaces. A million tons of coal a year and a wide range of cast iron goods were produced and shipped out by rail. From the entrance to the car park, turn right through the barrier and then immediately left. Cross a footbridge, climb the steps and ascend to meet the Trans Pennine Trail. Follow the improved path to the right through Thorncliffe Wood until you reach an industrial estate.Cross the road into Parkin Wood, turn left and pass a low wooden barrier. A steep climb brings you out of the trees by a set of swings. Head down to the left-hand corner into Warren and turn left along the road. Fork right and cross to the junction. Ignore the signed Trans Pennine Trail route and take the bridleway through the A-frame stile. Cross the busy A616 road and turn left along a faint path ascending the verge. This brings you to a kissing gate leading onto Tankersley Park Golf Course.Pass below the 15th tee to a waymarker post behind the wooden fence opposite. The path through the wood is neglected but navigable and is preferred for safety’s sake to the line shown on the OS Explorer, which runs along the edge of the fairway outside the wood. The golf course is busy at weekends and the possibility of being struck should be avoided. Pass to the left of the building and take the wider of the two waymarked paths past the hut overlooking the 14th tee. Pass the clubhouse and continue along the cinder track. When this ends, cross the fairway and pass the fifth tee to join a wall on your right. The path eventually leaves the edge of the fairway and meanders through the rough to the sixth tee. Turn left at a post and join the Barnsley Boundary Walk, the right-hand of two waymarked paths. This heads for and follows a line of overhead cables through the wooded fringe alongside the fairway.Pass a barrier, cross the wooden stile, descend and turn left to cross the footbridge over the A616. Ignore the bridleway dipping left and go straight on along a grassy ride. This becomes a cinder path descending into Westwood Country Park.Head down to the footpath sign at the corner of the wood and go straight through the barrier. Climb up into the open, cross a stile and turn left alongside a fence. There are views over High Green to your right and the Chapeltown woods in front. Continue to descend on the main path and bear right at the fork. Rejoin your outward path back to the car park.Public transport: bus services 1 and 1a. Service 66 from Rotherham to Chapeltown then the 1, 1a to High Green. Train from Barnsley to Chapeltown then the 1, 1a to High Green.

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  • Difficult
    05:01
    11.1 mi
    2.2 mph
    1,200 ft
    1,200 ft
    Expert Hiking Tour. Very good fitness required. Mostly accessible paths. Sure-footedness required.

    This challenging hike explores one of the wildest and most beautiful parts of the Peak District.On this route, you see the mighty Derwent Dam up-close, ascend to the ghostly moorland tor of Lost Lad, enjoy extensive panoramic views from Back Tor, and visit one of the areas most distinctive gritstone tors, Wheel Stones.Whilst the footpaths along this route are well defined, the landscape here is wild and can be isolated. As such, preparation is essential and map-reading/compass skills are recommended.From the car park, walk below the Derwent Dam and climb steps beside the right-hand tower to join the track on the east side of the Derwent Reservoir. Turn left and follow for just over one mile (two kilometers) to the second signposted footpath on the right. Bear right off the track and follow the path up, taking a left fork after the initial steep section. Continue along the gradually ascending footpath, which keeps parallel with the brook. After one mile (two kilometers), prominent landslips form a spectacular feature within the gorge. At the same point, Sheepfold Clough joins on the right.Take the right fork and follow a footpath up the clough and out of the gorge on to open moorland. Continue to a paved footpath. Turn left and follow this up to the cairn at Lost Lad, then continue for a further 547 yards (500 meters) to Back Tor.Turn right and follow the path along Derwent Edge for two-and-a-half miles (four kilometers), to the second footpath crossroads.Turn right on the bridleway and follow it downhill. Pass left through a gateway after half-a-mile (one kilometer) and keep straight on down past Grindle Barn to the banks of Ladybower. Turn right and follow the lane back to Derwent Dam and Fairholmes, passing the site of the now flooded Derwent Village.

  • Easy
    01:22
    3.10 mi
    2.3 mph
    250 ft
    250 ft
    Easy hike. Great for any fitness level. Easily-accessible paths. Suitable for all skill levels.

    This leisurely hike explores Sheffield’s oldest park, woodlands that are alive with industrial history and an ancient hillfort with one of the best views in the city.During the late 19th century, the Don Valley was producing 80 percent of Europe’s steel. This had a catastrophic effect on the ancient woodland nearby. Illegal felling during the General Strike in the 1920s and the Second World War all but destroyed it. However, the landscape was transformed through initiatives in the 1990s. Today, you will find this area a fascinating place to exploreThe route begins in Firth Park, the oldest park in the city, which was opened on August 16,1875, by Albert Edward, the then Prince of Wales, and Princess Alexander. Follow the path into the park, then double back 55 yards (50 meters) before the exit through the wood. Climb a second set of steps into the park and continue down to Firth Park Road. Enter Hinde Common Wood just below the junction with Firth Park Avenue, branch left and follow the path through the centre of the wood. Pass two flights of steps and turn left up a few steps to the road.From here, walk down Hindewood Close to the public footpath on the left. Keep to the improved path and bear right at the fork into Wincobank Wood. Turn left on the stepped path to the summit of Wincobank Hill. Go left for 109 yards (100 meters) along the cobbled path for the view over Rotherham to the northeast and across to Keppel’s Column before doubling back along the ridge.As you begin to descend it is worth diverting a few meters at the opening on your left to stand on the ramparts and look out over the Don Valley. A little further down the city centre comes into view and then the Northern General Hospital appears to your right. To the left, across the flat area below the boulders, runs Roman Ridge, the second scheduled ancient monument on the hill. Turn sharp right and follow the improved path back through Wincobank Wood. Branch left beyond the wood and again to complete the circuit.Instead of returning to Hindewood Close, bear right with the improved path to emerge higher up Hinde House Lane. Cross over into Firth Park Avenue and pass through the A-frame on your left. Descend the steps, turn left and then right down the next flight to the old lido. Turn left to re-enter the wood and pass to the rear of the Clock Tower. Turn right as you begin to ascend and then right to Firth Park Road. Cross and enter the park along a winding tarmac path. Follow this to the northern end or wander back across the grass to reach the First Start building, which houses a cafe and toilets.Public transport: bus services 1, 1a, 3, 75, 76, and 88. Train from Barnsley and Rotherham (or X78 bus) to Meadowhall, then the 3 or 35 to Firth Park.

  • Intermediate
    04:41
    10.0 mi
    2.1 mph
    1,425 ft
    1,425 ft
    Intermediate Hiking Tour. Good fitness required. Mostly accessible paths. Sure-footedness required.

    This route, or variations of it, is an absolute classic. Arguably the star attraction of the Peak District, Mam Tor and Great Ridge ignite the desire to explore—walkers from around the globe flock conquer this splendid route at all times of the year.Standing at 1,697 feet (517 meters) high, Mam Tor sits on the edge of the Dark Peak and the White Peak; boasting spectacular views for miles, including photographers-favorite Winnats Pass. Mam Tor means Mother Hill. It was named because the frequent landslides on its eastern face have created many mini-hills beneath it. These landslides, which are caused by unstable lower layers of shale, also give the hill its alternative name of 'Shivering Mountain' and have produced another of its attraction: the broken road, now twisted and broken from the hill's movements. This route is definitely challenging. Make sure you have sturdy boots, suitable clothing, a map and compass. The weather changes fast on Mam Tor and may have fallen victim to this. Do not fear, though, as far as it goes, most people can handle this. The village of Hope, where this hike starts, is just a 20-minute train ride from Sheffield city centre. As such, this wild and beautiful landscape could not be easier to reach. There are regular trains, as Hope is on the line to Manchester. You can also catch the 271 and 272 bus service. If you are travelling by car, however, a good starting point is from Castleton Visitor Centre car park.

  • Easy
    01:27
    3.27 mi
    2.3 mph
    275 ft
    275 ft
    Easy hike. Great for any fitness level. Easily-accessible paths. Suitable for all skill levels.

    This hike takes you along a branch of the Trans Pennine Trail to Woolley Wood; a place once ravished by industry, it is now a serene woodland. Woolley Wood is particularly beautiful in autumn when the leaves turn red and gold. It is also a great place to visit in early May when the bluebells flower. At any time of year, though, you will find it to be a peaceful place where cherry trees, hornbeam and yew flourish.From the top floor of Meadowhall Interchange, cross the enclosed walkway to the car park and turn right down the steps. Join the Trans Pennine Trail, pass the Travelodge and continue along the Chapeltown branch of the Trail. Double back left before the next A-frame stile, cross Fife Street, turn right and right again at the traffic lights. Walk through the car park-an alternative starting point-and ascend past the BMX track into the wood.Keep to the wide main path, signed Concord Park, over a path junction by a golf tee and continue to climb. Emerge onto the golf course and cross the fairways to a junction with a Trans Pennine Trail signpost, where you turn left. Pass through an A-frame stile and turn right alongside the hedge. Continue through an A-frame alongside the hedge to another leading into Woolley Wood.Follow the main path down steps into the wood and go straight ahead at a junction down more steps. Descend a good distance with a ravine on your left. At the point where a path branches left down yet more steps, continue straight ahead. The path undulates alongside a steep bank until it merges with a lower path by a seat and bends uphill past a wooden barrier. Turn left at a T-junction, 109 yards (100 meters) beyond which you will see the other two tree carvings and the runic Lost Gateway visible beyond. Turn left past the information panel back to the car park and to rejoin the outward route back to Meadowhall Interchange.There are regular buses and trams to Meadowhall Interchange.

  • Difficult
    06:58
    15.4 mi
    2.2 mph
    1,675 ft
    1,675 ft
    Expert Hiking Tour. Very good fitness required. Mostly accessible paths. Sure-footedness required.

    Walking through the Chatsworth Estate, it can often feel like time has stood still for hundreds of years. With the glorious stately home standing proudly, the River Wye meandering gently, the ancient hedgerows, neat dry-stone walls and picturesque chocolate-box villages, this is Peak District countryside at its very best—whatever the season. While this route is fairly lengthy—do not be put off! All the paths are relatively leisurely and there are plenty of pubs, cafes, restaurants, and facilities en route. And, if you are getting tired, there are a few opportunities to cut the route short.However, if you do decide to take on the full route, prepare to be impressed; magical bluebell woods, English meadows, rolling hills, patchwork fields, breathtaking views and picnic spots aplenty—take a full day, take your time and let the beauty soak in. The thing with honeypot places like Chatsworth is that, owing to their spectacular beauty, they can get busy with tourists. However, by wandering off the beaten track just a little, you are rewarded with peace and tranquility that many miss.You can reach the village of Baslow, where this route starts, in just over 30 minutes via the 218 and 215 bus services from Sheffield city centre—making it a must-see on any visit to the Outdoor City.

Collection Stats

  • Tours
    7
  • Distance
    58.2 mi
  • Duration
    26:21 h
  • Elevation
    6,275 ft
Hike the beauty of the outdoor city — Sheffield
Hiking Collection by
The Outdoor City Sheffield